The Japan Times: Dec. 1, 2002


Strange public works allergy

By GREGORY CLARK

不思議な公共事業アレルギー
グレゴリー・クラーク


Sunday saw the opening of the long-delayed Morioka-Hachinohe extension of the Tohoku Shinkansen (Northeast Japan bullet-train line). Local people will be happy. But don't expect great outbursts of joy elsewhere. Japan is into one of its periodic antipublic works moods.

I traveled the original Tohoku line the day it opened in 1982. As we streaked across this hitherto neglected area of Japan, even this jaded foreigner could not suppress a twinge of excitement. But arriving back in Tokyo that evening I found the media most unimpressed: "a waste of money," "a concrete dinosaur," "the Kakuei Tanaka Shinkansen" (a derisive reference to the former prime minister who had pushed hard for a network of expressways and shinkansen lines across Japan.)

Today, even the critics must realize the importance of the line, not just to the Tohoku region but to the nation. As for wasted money, the line now runs at close to full capacity and covers its costs easily. Even the Joetsu line to Niigata, which opened the same year and was much more vulnerable to criticism (since Tanaka was notorious for pushing public monies into his native Niigata Prefecture) is doing quite well financially.

This distaste for needed public works is strange. In other advanced economies, the indirect or ripple effects of new transport links are carefully calculated. Governments are happy to use tax monies to fund projects that promise large indirect gains, even if there is little or no direct return on income. Japan, though, tries to insist that projects be entirely self-financing with direct income from day one.

I was once a member of a committee monitoring construction of the Inland Sea bridges linking Honshu with Shikoku. From the start, it should have been obvious that the expected traffic could not possibly provide enough toll revenue to cover costs and that, in any case, the tolls should be kept low enough to increase traffic and to encourage Shikoku developments that would benefit the nation.

But when I put this to the "amakudari" (bureaucrats headed for cushy private-sector jobs upon retirement from government service) in charge, all I could get were recitations of Ministry of Finance directives saying tolls had to be set at levels that would cover all capital repayments and costs, including the high interest rates on funds borrowed from the post office savings system. Now the government faces public ridicule and anger over the high tolls, the low traffic volumes and the fact that large deficits will have to be filled with tax funds.

The Aqualine tunnel and bridge linking Kawasaki and the Boso Peninsula has suffered the same abuse, despite its potential for assisting in the development of another very neglected area close to the nation's capital.

The Japanese mind seems to find it hard to grasp intangibles like indirect benefits. True, the public is entitled to anger over the waste and corruption in public works. But this leads to yet another Japanese mind-set: a weakness in making causal connections. Rather than tackle the waste and corruption head on, the call is for no more public works. Throwing out babies with the bath water makes about the same kind of sense.

Another baby to suffer has been Japan's post office savings system. It is blamed for letting its funds be used to finance deficit projects. Few seem to notice that without those funds, these projects would from the start have had to be funded with tax monies.

The Japanese liking for thinking small -- the fascination with bonsai and "bento" boxes, as one author put it -- could be another antipublic works factor. The Chinese are quick to let the world know about their large projects. When the Europeans build a tunnel under the Alps, prime ministers and presidents from neighboring countries flood in for the opening ceremony. But when the longer and more impressive Oshimizu tunnel under volcanic central Honshu was opened, only a construction minister showed up.

True, the Japanese ability to focus intently on what they see before them and ignore everything else has its merits. It makes for good quality control, trains that run on time and quite a few other virtues. But just now Japan needs more than this. It needs to realize that a chronic weakness in consumer demand is crippling this otherwise powerful economy and that, for the time being at least, the only solution is a large increase in useful public works spending.

Japan's reformist politicians and economists manage to think the exact opposite. They are caught up with Western supply-side economic theories that were supposed to have rescued our economies from prolonged slumps of the past -- structural reforms, cuts in taxes and government spending, etc.

But Japan's economy, like much of its value system, is fundamentally different from that of the West, or China for that matter. Supply is chronically overabundant relative to demand. It is demand that has to be increased.

In effect, Japan is being told to put on the brakes when it should be pressing the accelerator. Halfhearted stabs at the accelerator when the car stalls do little to help. The current fiscal policy farce is a good example -- an administration insisting that it is on track to cut spending even as it is forced to bring in a supplementary budget to increase spending to cope with worsening economic and employment conditions caused by its spending cuts.

Japan should reverse course, quickly. A commitment to finish the second Tomei Expressway project -- yet another victim of the current public works allergy despite its obvious development effects and high potential toll revenues -- would be a good start. A second Wangan highway linking Tokyo with Chiba and extending the Tohoku Shinkansen line to Aomori should be other priorities.

Improvements to congested urban highways can have even larger benefits. In a rare example of calculating indirect gains, the Nihon Keizai newspaper has told us that the 60 billion yen spent to widen a notorious bottleneck on the Tokyo ring road two years ago saved 20 billion yen a year in congestion costs.

By taxing and spending more for public works, Japan would both improve its infrastructure and rescue its economy -- killing two very large birds with one stone.
12月1日の日曜日に、東北新幹線の盛岡ー八戸間が開通した。だいぶ待たされた開通だったから、地元の人たちはさぞかしうれしかったろう。しかし、他の地方でもこうした歓喜がほとばしっていると思ったら大まちがいだ。日本は今、周期的に訪れる反公共事業ムードに陥っているからである。

最初の東北新幹線が開通したのは1982年だ。私は、開通当日に、これに乗って東北を旅した。これまでなおざりにされてきたこの地方を、疾風(はやて)のようにつっきって行くとき、私のようなやくざな外人でさえ、胸がきゅんとなるような感動を覚えた。しかし、その晩東京に戻ってみると、「税金のむだ遣い」、「コンクリートの恐竜」、「田中角栄新幹線」(機関車のような馬力をもって日本中に高速道路網や新幹線路線網を作った元首相を茶化した表現)という見出しからもわかるように、メディアはまったく感動していなかった。

今日、東北新幹線の重要性については、批評家でさえはっきりと理解せざるをえない。東北地方にとって重要だというだけでなく、日本全体にとって重要なのだ。税金のむだ遣いと言われた点についても、現在の乗客利用率はほぼ100パーセントで、コストはゆうにカバーされている。1982年には、上越新幹線も開通した。田中角栄が自分の故郷の新潟にしゃにむに公費をもってきたとして悪名高く、より厳しい批判にさらされてきたが、こちらも財政的にはかなりうまくいっている。

必要な公共事業をきらう日本人のこの傾向は不思議である。他の経済先進国で新規に輸送路線を建設するときは、まず間接的効果や波及的効果を綿密に計算する。そして、大型プロジェクトの間接的利益が大きければ、たとえ直接的収入が少ないかゼロであっても、政府は喜んで税金を投入する。だが、日本では、プロジェクト初日から完全に自己採算でやるように求められる。

私はかつて、本州と四国を結ぶ瀬戸大橋の建設監視委員会の委員をつとめたことがある。予想される通行料金収入だけではコストがまかないきれないだろうから、交通量を増やして、四国の開発を奨励するためには(それは国のためにもなる)、料金を低く設定しなければならないのは、最初から明らかだったはずだ。

しかし、私がこの考えを担当の天下りに提案すると、返ってきた言葉は大蔵省の行政指導のくりかえしだった。つまり、郵貯からの借入金の高利を含む、元利償還とコストのすべてを通行料金収入でまかなえというのである。さて、現在、政府が直面している問題は何かというと、それは、高い通行料金にたいする一般の愚弄と怒り、低い利用率、大赤字を税金で穴埋めしなければならないという事実である。

川崎と房総半島をつなぐアクアラインも、同じような悪口を浴びてきた。だがトンネルは、もう一つのなおざりにされた地域、それも首都に近い地域の開発にとって、大きな助けとなる可能性を秘めている。

日本人の頭は、間接的な利益というような、直かに手に触れることができないものを把握するのが下手なのではないだろうか?なるほど、国民は、公共事業がらみの浪費や腐敗を怒る権利がある。しかし、これが、「因果関係の把握が下手」という日本人のもう一つの思考態度を誘発してしまうのだ。つまり、浪費と腐敗に正面切って取り組むのではなく、公共事業そのものがだめであるという非難の合唱になってしまう。いわば、汚れた産湯といっしょに可愛い赤ちゃんまで捨ててしまうようなものである。

かわいそうな目にあっている赤ちゃんは他にもいる。郵貯である。郵貯は、赤字プロジェクトに投資しているとして非難されている。だが、もし郵貯の投資がなければ、こうしたプロジェクトは最初から全面的に税金の世話にならなければならなかったろう。だが、これに気づく者は少ない。

ある作家が、盆栽や弁当に凝ることからもわかるように、日本人は「縮む思考」が好きだと言ったが、これも公共事業拒否要因の一つかもしれない。大型プロジェクトを行うとき、中国はいち早く世界に知らせる。ヨーロッパ人がアルプスの下にトンネルを作ったとき、近隣諸国の外務大臣、首相、大統領はこぞって開通式に臨んだ。だが、日本で、これよりもっと長く、もっとすばらしい大清水トンネルが、火山帯が走る本州中央部を縦断して開通したとき、祝典に顔を見せたのは建設大臣だけだった。

目前のことだけに集中し、それ以外のことはひたすら無視するという日本人の才能には利点もある。おかげで、品質管理は高度だし、電車や列車は時刻表通りに到着する、等々。しかし、今の日本は、それ以上のものを必要としている。消費者需要の慢性的な弱さが、この点以外は強い経済の足をひっぱっているという事実、そして少なくともしばらくは、公共事業支出を急増させる以外に解決法はないことを、日本人は理解しなければならない。

だが、日本の改革主義の政治家やエコノミストは、なんとかその正反対のことを考えようとして、西欧の供給サイドに立った経済理論に夢中になっている。こうした経済理論では、日本の長びく経済不振は、構造改革、減税、緊縮財政などで解決できるはずはない。

実は、日本の経済は、その価値体系と同様、西欧や中国と根本的に違う。需要に比べ、供給が慢性的に過剰なのである。増やさなければならないのは需要の方なのだ。

実際、日本は、アクセルを踏まなければならないときなのにブレーキを踏んでいる。エンストしたとき、アクセルを生半可(なまはんか)に踏んでも、少しも役に立たない。現在の財政政策という茶番劇がその良い例だ。緊縮財政
のせいでますます悪化している経済・雇用状態に対処するために、政府は補正予算を組まざるをえなくなった。にもかかわらず、行政はまだ、緊縮財政は妥当だと言い続けている。

日本はなるだけ早く、180度の方向転換をしなければならない。第二東名高速道路を完成させるという約束も、明らかに高い開発効果や料金収入が期待できるにもかかわらず、現在の公共事業アレルギーの犠牲になっている。東京と千葉を結ぶ第二湾岸ハイウエーや東北新幹線の青森までの延長も優先事項だ。

首都の幹線道路の渋滞を改良すれば、さらに大きな恩恵をもたらすことができる。めずらしく間接的な利益の計算がなされた例として、日本経済新聞の数字がある。これによると、二年前、東京の環状線の中でも、特に慢性的な交通渋滞をひきおこしていることで悪名高かった交差点を広げるために、600億円が費やされた。現在これにより交通渋滞が緩和され、一年で200億円のメリットが生まれた。

増税と公共事業予算を増やすことで、日本はインフラも改善できるし、国の経済を救うこともできる。まさに、一石二鳥ではないか。それも、かなり大きな鳥だと思うのだが。

Gregory Clark is honorary president of Tama University. He can be accessed at www.gregoryclark.net


The Japan Times: Dec. 1, 2002
(C) All rights reserved

Reprinted with permission.

グレゴリー・クラークは前摩大学名誉学長。ウエブサイトwww.gregoryclark.net
ザ・ジャパン・タイムズ 2002年12月1日

Japanese Translation by Maki Wakiyama 

翻訳者:脇山真木

Home