Japan Times

Racist banner looks frayed


By GREGORY CLARK Japan Times 2005.02.17
ほころび目立つ“人種主義”の旗じるし
ジャパンタイムズ 2005.02.17
Understanding Japan and the Japanese was never meant to be easy. This is especially true for the Japanese attitude to foreigners -- at times exclusivist and at other times extremely open. There is an answer to the seeming contradiction, but it requires outsiders to accept that the Japanese might have a value system just as valid as their own -- something many find hard to accept.

Back in the 1970s, when Canberra was determinedly trying to understand the nation that was suddenly supporting Australia's economy with large food and raw materials purchases, it gave the well-known author Hal Porter a generous cultural grant to travel around Japan and discover its people.

In his subsequent book, "The Actors," Porter describes the Japanese as a robotic people quite incapable of expressing genuine sentiment -- a surprising conclusion for anyone who has seen the animated faces of the Japanese crowds as they head home from work on a Friday evening.

Porter went on to write a nasty short story, "Mr. Butterfry," about a former Australian soldier who had stayed on from the Occupation days, married a Japanese woman and had two daughters. Porter met them and decided that these mixed-blood children, and their father, would have no future in exclusivist Japan.

If Porter were still alive, he would have discovered that one of the daughters had married an heir to the Bridgestone Tire family fortunes. The other married the politician Kunio Hatoyama, grandson of a former prime minister. And the ex-sergeant had gone on to a happy old age, fussed over by his family and others in Japan's elite.

Soon after, the Europeans weighed in with a famous report claiming the Japanese were a nation of workaholics living in rabbit hutches. Then, during the trade frictions of the 1980s, it was the turn of the Americans to bash Japan.

Perhaps the worst example was a Washington Post report claiming that a Tokyo store selling Sambo dolls proved that racist Japanese attitudes toward black people existed. It triggered a strong anti-Japan campaign in the United States -- until someone discovered that the offending dolls had come from the U.S. and were on sale there, too.

The Post went on to discover, back in the days when Japan was prospering and the U.S. economy was in trouble, that the Japanese had invented the term "bubei," or contempt for America. It even splashed the ideographs on its front page, which is just as well because we could not find them being used in Japan.

The newspaper USA Today followed up with a report from a Tokyo-based journalist saying the Roppongi fleshpots were riddled with "No Foreigner" and "Japanese Only" signs. Once again, no visible proof could be provided. When I checked with the author of the report, he complained how his copy had been deliberately changed by U.S. editors determined to believe such signs existed.

With the trade frictions largely ended, the banner has been passed to ultrasensitive foreigners here in Japan. They too complain of a rash of "No Foreigner" signs. What's more, they are determined to take legal action against the "racist" offenders. But when one checks out the claims, invariably it is a situation where some unfortunate Japanese proprietor has suffered severe damage or loss at the hands of foreigners, and does not want to see a repetition.

The landmark case almost a decade ago involved a jewelry shop owner in Hamamatsu, where many underprivileged Brazilians now live thanks to Japan's policy of allowing the kin of former Japanese migrants abroad to come and work in Japan. His display counters had become a favorite window-shopping target. There was also some shoplifting.

Eventually he felt he had no choice but to put up a sign saying "No Brazilians," only to be dragged through the courts, and heavily fined, by some of those ultrasensitive foreigners claiming he had violated a Tokyo-ratified U.N. convention banning racial discrimination.

Now we have the problems in Otaru, a Hokkaido port regularly visited by small rust-bucket Russian ships. A bathhouse that had suffered severe property destruction at the hands of drunken Russian seamen had felt it had no alternative but to put up a "No Foreigner" sign. It too was hit with a suit claiming it had violated the U.N. convention.

The litigious foreigners involved have now published a book, detailing their fight against yet another example of Japan's alleged racial discrimination (for a review, see the Jan. 30 article "Bathhouse pushes a foreigner into the doghouse").

Yet to anyone who visits Otaru and speaks to the seamen, as I have done, it should be obvious that, while these are very likable people, it is most unlikely that they would be able to respect the rituals and atmosphere of the Japanese bathhouse, even when sober. Japanese customers would begin to fade away. The owner would feel obliged to protect his business.

The failure of some foreigners here to realize that the Japanese, too, have their sensitivities seems alarming.
 日本と日本人を理解するのが簡単だったためしはない。とくに外国人に対する日本人の態度について、それがいえる。あるときは排外主義的、またあるときは非常にオープンだ。この一見矛盾するような現象への答えは、ある。だがそれには、外部者が、日本人も外国人と全く同じように、正当性を持つ価値体系を持っていること― 多くの人にとって受け入れ困難なことだが― を受け入れる必要がある。
 1970年代にさかのぼって、日本が突然、大量の食料、一次産品の輸入でオーストラリア経済を支える政策に転換したとき、オーストラリア政府がどうしても日本を理解する必要に迫られて、著名な作家ハル・ポーターに惜しみない文化補助金を与え、日本を旅行して回らせ日本人を発見させようとした。
 ポーターはその成果である著書“ザ・アクターズ”の中で、自然な感情を表すことがどうしてもできないロボット的な人間として、日本人を描いた。金曜日の夜仕事から帰宅する日本人群衆の生き生きした顔を目撃した人としては驚くべき結論だ。
 ポーターは続いて“ミスター・バタフライ”というタイトルで、日本占領時代から日本に滞在し、日本女性と結婚し、二人の娘をもった元オーストラリア兵についての嫌味な短編を書いた。ポーターは彼らに面会し、この排他的な日本でこの二人の混血児とその父親には、将来はないだろうと決めてかかった。
 もしポーターが健在だったら、娘の一人はブリジストンタイヤ財閥の世継ぎと結婚したことを知っただろう。もうひとりの娘は、元首相の孫で政治家の鳩山邦夫と結婚した。そして元兵士は日本のエリート界で家族や友人にちやほやされて、幸せな老境を過ごした。
 その後まもなく、ヨーロッパの連中が、日本人はウサギ小屋に住むワーカホリックだと批判したリポートが世を騒がせた。続いての貿易摩擦時代は、アメリカ人が日本たたきをする番だった。
 最悪の例は、おそらく、ワシントン・ポストのリポート― サンボの人形を売っている東京の店は、日本人の黒人に対する人種主義が健在な証拠だというもの―で、それはだれかがその怒りを招いた問題の人形はアメリカから来たものでアメリカでも売られていることを発見するまで続いた、強い反日キャンペーンの引き金となった。
 ワシントン・ポストはまた、新しい発見として、かつて日本が繁栄していてアメリカ経済がトラブっていたとき、日本人は“侮米”(アメリカ蔑視)という言葉を発明した、ということをもちだした。同紙はまた、第一面に華々しくその漢字を書き出しさえしたが、その字は日本で見つからなかったので、ちょうどいい勉強になった。「USAトゥデイ」という新聞はこれを引き継いで、多くのホテルやクラブやバーで“外国人お断り”とか“日本人に限る”の貼紙にあふれていると書いた東京をベースとするジャーナリストのリポートを掲載した。この場合もまた、はっきりした証拠は見つからなかった。私がそのリポートの寄稿者に尋ねたとき、彼は自分の記事が、どうしてもその貼紙があったと信じたいアメ。
 貿易摩擦が大枠で収まった後、この旗印は、今度は、日本に住むウルトラ神経質な外国人の手に渡された。彼らもまた、“外国人お断り”の多発に不満を述べた。その上彼らは、こうした“人種主義”犯人を相手取って法的措置をとろうと堅く決意していた。ところが、その言い分をチェックしてみると、きまって、ある運の悪い日本人経営者が外国人によってひどい被害や損害を受けたため、二度と同じ被害に会いたくないというわけだった。
 もう10年ほど前、画期的なケースとなったのが、浜松の宝石店経営者の例だ。旧日本人海外移民の子孫は日本に来て働くことができるという日本の寛大な政策のおかげで、浜松には恵まれないブラジル人がたくさん住んでいる。この宝石店のショーケースは彼らのお気に入りのウインドショッピングの場所になった。万引きも起きるようになった。
 やがては“ブラジル人お断り”とした貼紙を出す決意をするしか道がないまでになった。その結果、その経営者は、日本が批准している国連の人種差別禁止協定に違反したと言い張る一部の超神経質な外国人によって、裁判に引き出され、重い罰金を科せられた。
 そして今度は、ロシアのポンコツ船が定期的に立ち寄る北海道の港小樽の事件である。酔っ払ったロシア人船員たちによってひどい器物破損ほかの被害を受けた銭湯の経営者が
“外国人お断り”の貼紙を出すほかに手がないと追いつめられた。彼もまた国連協定に違反すると訴えられるという目にあった。訴訟好きな外国人たちが、今度は本を出した。自分たちが、またまた日本の“人種差別”のケースに対していかに闘ったか、詳しくまとめたものだ。(その本の書評は“銭湯が一外国人を犬小屋へ追いやる”のタイトルで1月30日の本紙に掲載)。
 ところで、私のように、小樽を訪れて船員たちと話をした人ならみなすぐ分かることだが、彼らはまことに愛すべき連中ではあるが、彼らが、たとえ素面のときでも、日本の銭湯の細かな約束事を守り雰囲気を尊重することができるとは、到底思えない。日本人の客がその銭湯を敬遠し始めるのは時間の問題だろうし、銭湯の主人は自分の商売を守らなければならない。
 日本に住む一部の外国人が、日本人もまた、自分と同じに敏感さを持っていることが理解できない現状は、由々しき問題だ。


Home