The Japan Times: Nov. 15, 2002


Economic foolishness deepens

By GREGORY CLARK

深刻化する経済愚策 

グレゴリー・クラーク

We knew that Japan's economic debate was fairly foolish when Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told us that structural reforms such as privatizing highway corporations and the post office would somehow revitalize the Japanese economy. But even that looks sensible compared with the latest proposed "reform" -- purging banks to abolish bad loans. Nonperforming loans are a result, not a cause, of Japan's poor economic conditions. Most bad loans are the direct result of bankruptcies and falling asset values since Japan's reform mania began in 1997. Purging banks will create even more bankruptcies, more asset price falls and more bad loans.

Even Koizumi supporters admit some of this. Yet they seem caught up in a semireligious belief that cleansing the financial stables will somehow allow Japan to make a fresh start. Many in the United States thought the same after the 1929 crash, and we know what happened after that.

True, Japan's bad loans were morally repulsive, with money poured into the pockets of gangsters, corrupt politicians and mad speculators for years. But economically they are history. Every economy has large areas of waste -- the military, festivals, official incompetence, excessive welfare, the 40 billion yen being spent on Koizumi's new official residence. But provided the money returns to the economy, the economic damage is low.

For years the pundits told us that China's bad loans to inefficient state enterprises -- then put at 25 percent of GNP as against the mere 8 percent for Japan's bad loans -- would break the Chinese economy. Today, as booming investment and consumer demand pushes that economy even further ahead, the problems, and the pundits, are quietly disappearing.

Bad loans cause harm only if they weaken bank reserves. Japan's banks have money to lend. What they lack is creditworthy borrowers, thanks to Koizumi's policies. Fears of being purged forces them to be even more wary in their lending policies. Somehow the Koizumi people turn this round to say that the banks' reluctance to lend causes the bad economic conditions and thus justifies the purging.

The shallowness of Japan's economic debate is appalling. A hard core of senior coalition politicians close to the economy tries hard to warn the prime minister of the deflationary dangers they see on every side. But he just aimlessly repeats his "no pain, no gain" mantra, and most of Japan is happy to follow, Pied Piper-like, behind.

Foreign pundits indoctrinated in the leftwing evils of government spending join the queue. So does the U.S. government. It says a resurgent Japan is needed as an economic counterweight in Asia to China.

For those who believe that a subdued Japan is necessary for a stable Asia, Washington's economic wisdom is most welcome.

Japan's basic problem should long ago have been obvious. It is the chronic lack of consumer demand. Even the Koizumi people admit that consumers are not spending enough. Their glib explanation is that lack of reforms makes people anxious about the future. But in that case why even at the height of bubble optimism were household savings only a few points below today's very high levels? Economic damage was averted only by the two-decade-long export and asset boom, now ended.

Three factors help explain the high savings rates. One is a skewed wage system that favors the nonspending elderly. Another is the massive transfers of wealth into the coffers of the same gentrified people during past land booms -- more than one half of Japan's extraordinary 1.4 quadrillion yen of personal financial assets is held by people over 65.

Finally, strong workplace identity means most salaried people have neither the time nor the incentives for the lifestyle spending that today keeps most other advanced economies bubbling along.

On top of all this are typical Japanese worry-wart concerns over the future, even when times are good. None of these factors is likely to disappear soon.

What to do? Deregulated and new service industries might help create some new demand and investment. But don't hold your breath waiting. Meanwhile Japan's demand gap expands daily. The latest figures are frightening. Since reform mania hit Japan, worried individuals have added 20 trillion yen to bank deposits, while firms preferring to repay loans rather than risk new investments have added a net 20 million yen.

Lacking borrowers, banks have spent 30 trillion yen of those surplus funds buying government bonds, despite low interest rates. The pundits who warned us that large official deficits would cause a crisis-inducing flight from government bonds now have even more egg on their faces.

If individuals and firms don't want to spend, then clearly the gap has to be filled by government spending, financed by more bond sales to soak up more surplus funds or by increased taxes. Needless to say, Tokyo wants to do the exact reverse. It wants to cut government spending, and embraces tax cuts which in Japan, unlike in the U.S., have only weak stimulatory effects.

Tokyo also tries to rely on monetary policy levers, which are useless when interest rates are already close to zero. Fiscal policy is now the only answer. A massive burst of extra spending -- say 10 trillion yen to 20 trillion yen -- into areas with high employment and flow-on effects is the only way this economy can be turned round.

The arguments against fiscal remedies range from the silly to the ridiculous: They lead to waste and corruption, we are told. Well, get rid of the waste and corruption. They were tried in the past and did not work, it is said. In fact, they worked very well before 1997, and in any case they were meant mainly as a much-needed prop, not as a stimulus, to the economy.

They will add to the official deficit, it is also claimed. True, the official deficit is high, but is still only half of the bloated 1.4 quadrillion yen total for personal financial assets. And so on.

Tokyo now says it is creating a special government agency with a 10 trillion yen-20 trillion yen budget to rescue and help reorganize worthwhile firms sent bankrupt by the planned bank purges. I have a better idea: Instead of spending the money after the firms collapse and deflation gets out of control, why not spend it beforehand?

 
 
小泉首相が、道路公団や郵政事業の民営化といった構造改革により、日本経済はなんとか再生できるだろうと言ったとき、われわれは、日本の経済論争はそうとう愚かしいということがわかった。しかし、これさえ、まだ筋が通っていると思わせるのが、最近提案された「総合デフレ対策案」(不良債権を処理するために、銀行を粛清する)である。焦げつきローンは、日本経済の惨状の結果でこそあれ、原因ではない。ほとんどの不良債権は、日本に改革病が始まった1997年以降に発生した銀行倒産や資産価値の下落の直接的な結果なのである。この上銀行を粛清すれば、銀行倒産はさらに増え、資産価値がさらに下落し、不良債権が今以上に増加することになるだろう。

 小泉支持派でさえ、多少はこの点を認めている。それにもかかわらず、金融という厩舎を消毒すれば、日本という馬はなんとか元気なスタートを切れるという、ほとんど信仰に近い信念にこり固まっている。1929年の大暴落の後、多くのアメリカ人が同じことを考えた。その結果がどうなったかは、みなの知るところだ。

 日本の不良債権に、モラル的な問題があったのは本当だ。金は、暴力団、腐敗政治家、のぼせ上がった山師のふところに流れこんだ。しかし、経済的に見ると、これはすでに過去のことである。どんな経済にだって、大きな出費をよぎなくされる分野はある。たとえば、軍隊、祝祭、無能な役人、過剰福祉。400億円もかかった首相官邸だってそうだ。だが、こうした出費も、金が経済に還元されるなら、経済的なダメジは小さくてすむ。

 経済評論家の先生やコメンテーターたちは、中国の不良債権(当時、日本の不良債権がGNP比8パーセントだったのに対して、中国は25パーセント)と能率の低い国営企業が、中国経済を破綻させるだろうと長年言い続けてきた。しかし、今日、活発な投資と消費者需要を追い風に、中国経済は邁進し続けている。そして、諸問題も(経済評論家の先生たちも)、静かに消えつつある。
 不良債権が危害をおよぼすのは、銀行の引当金が弱いときだけである。日本の銀行には貸付用の資金はある。ないのは、(小泉政権の経済政策のおかげで)、信頼できる借り手の方なのだ。粛清の恐怖におびえる銀行は、これまで以上に慎重な融資態度をとらざるをえない。一方、小泉派はなんとかして、銀行の貸し渋りが不況の原因だから、粛清は正当化されるという風に解釈したい。

 日本の経済論争の希薄さにはぞっとさせられる。連立政権の経済に近い古参政治家たちの中核は、どちらを向いても目に入ってくるデフレの危険を、首相に警告しようとやっきとなっている。しかし、首相は漫然と、「まだ痛みが出ていない、出ていない」と呪文のように繰り返すばかり。そして、国民の大半も、ハーメルンの笛吹き男についていく子供の行列のように、嬉々として首相の後に従っている。

 この列に加わったのが、政府が金をつぎこむことは左翼的な悪だという考えを植えつけた海外の偉い経済評論家たちだ。アメリカ政府も、日本の復活は、アジアにおける中国との対抗経済として必要だとして、これに加わった。

 アジアの安定化のためには、おとなしくなった日本が必要だと信じる者たちにとって、ワシントンの経済学的な知恵は大歓迎である。
 
 日本がかかえる根本的な問題は、もっと早くに明らかにさせておくべきだった。問題は、慢性的な消費者需要の不足なのである。小泉擁護派でさえ、消費者の金遣いが足りないことを認めている。その口先三寸の説明によると、改革不足が、国民に将来の不安をいだかせているからだという。だが、もしそうであるなら、バブル楽観主義が頂点に達していたときの貯蓄率が、今日の最高貯蓄率をわずか数ポイント切るだけだったのはなぜなのだろう?日本が経済的なダメジを回避できたのは、バブル以前の20年もの長期にわたって続いた輸出と不動産ブームのおかげである。だが、それも今は終わってしまった。

 高貯蓄率をもたらした要因は三つある。第一の要因は、消費志向の少ない年輩者を優遇するゆがんだ賃金制度だ。第二は、過去の土地ブームのときに、富が、やはり年輩者の懐に大量に移動した点である。日本の1400兆円という途方もない個人の金融資産は、その半分以上が、65歳以上の人たちの手にある。

 第三の要因は、職場が強力な社会的アイデンティティーになっているサラリーマンには、「ライフスタイル支出」*のための時間もインセンティブもない点だ。他の先進国の経済をふくらませているのは、実はこのライフスタイル支出なのである。(*ライフスタイル支出:たとえば、セカンドハウト、セカンドカー、ヨット、プール)

 さらには、細かいことにくよくよする日本人ならではの、将来にたいする不安がある。この不安は、良き時代にもあった。以上述べたような要因は、おいそれとは消えそうにもない。

 では、どうすればいいのだろう?規制を撤廃した新しいサービス産業の創造は、多少の新需要や投資を生むのに役立つかもしれない。しかし、息をこらして待っているだけではだめである。ところで、日本の需要ギャップは、日毎に大きくなる一方だ。最近の数字を見てぎょっとした。改革病が日本をおそって以来、苦労性の個人は、銀行口座にさらに20兆円を預けたのである。企業も、新しい投資に賭けるより、借入金を返済する方を選んだ。これが正味20兆円になる。

 銀行は、借り手不足でできた余剰資金のうちの30兆円で、低金利にもかかわらず国債を買った。「国の大赤字は、危機を誘導しかねないほどの国債離れをひき起こすだろう」と警告した経済評論家の先生たちは、今やさらに面目を失ってしまった。

 個人や企業が金を使いたくないとなると、そのギャップは、政府による支出、余剰資金をさらに吸収するための国債発行、増税などの手段をもって埋めるしかないのは明らかだ。いうまでもなく、政府はこれと正反対のこと、すなわち政府の支出を減らし、減税をしたい。だが、アメリカと違って、日本では、減税がもたらす刺激効果は弱いのである。

 政府はまた、金融政策によるテコ入れも試みている。しかし、金利がすでにゼロに近いのだから、これはむだ骨というものだ。そうなると、頼みの綱は財政政策あるのみ。日本経済を方向転換させるには、10兆円から20兆円ぐらいの特別支出を、高雇用と連動効果のある分野に注入するしかない。

 財政出動による救済にたいする反対論は、愚かなものからばからしいものまで、いろいろある。こうした救済策は、むだ遣いや腐敗につながると言う反論もある。では、むだ遣いや腐敗を排除すればいいではないかと言うと、すでにやってみたが、だめだったという答が返ってくる。実は、この方法は、1997年以前は非常に有効だったのだ。いずれにせよ、このような救済策は、経済の刺激策ではなく、経済を支える大事なつっかい棒とみなされるべきである。

 財政赤字が増えるという反論もある。実際、財政赤字はきわめて大きい。だが、個人の金融資産の総額1400兆円という数字に比べると、まだ半分だけである。云々。

 今、政府は、10兆から20兆円の予算を組んで、特別な政府機関(産業再生機構)を作り、銀行の粛清がらみで倒産してしまったが、再生価値のある貸出先については救済し、立ち直らせると言っている。だが、私にはもっといい考えがある。この金(財政)を、こうした企業が倒産して、デフレが手に負えなくなってから使うのではなく、その前に投入してみたらどうだろう?

Gregory Clark is honorary president of Tama University. He can be accessed at www.gregoryclark.net


The Japan Times: Nov. 15, 2002
(C) All rights reserved

Reprinted with permission.

グレゴリー・クラークは前摩大学名誉学長。ウエブサイトwww.gregoryclark.net
ザ・ジャパン・タイムズ 2002年11月15日

Japanese Translation by Maki Wakiyama

翻訳者:脇山真木

Home