Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Cross-strait gap narrows


Two things became apparent during a recent visit to China. One was the vitality of the economy; the critics who fussed over China's recent export downturn overlooked Beijing's ability to shift to a domestic demand-oriented economy. The other was the importance of Taiwan in Beijing's thinking.

True, Taiwan has always been important. No self-respecting government would tolerate the nearby existence of a small, discredited and defeated civil war faction claiming the right, first to counterattack, then to represent the entire nation, and finally to be independent and tie up with China's enemy, the United States.

But with the reconciliation-minded Ma Ying-jeou elected to the Taiwan presidency last year, the planners on both sides have been working hard to develop closer links. Trade and investment are taking off. At an academic conference I attended in Beijing last month, by far the most popular booth for students and teachers seeking exchange ties abroad was the Taiwan booth.

But obstacles remain. Taiwan's main opposition grouping, the Democratic Progressive Party, condemns Ma for pushing Taiwan into the same "one-country, two-systems" direction as Hong Kong, with Beijing having ultimate control over Taiwan policies. Ma denies this, but on my China visit it was clear how determinedly Beijing tries to bracket Taiwan visitors with Hong Kong and Macau visitors for special treatment.

At our conference we were given an unusually frank talk by an adviser to China's National People's Congress policy planning office, professor Jin Canrong. He warned that the current "window of opportunity" for closer relations might last only three more years, until the next Taiwan elections when growing calls for Taiwan independence would have yet another chance to emerge.

China, too, had a window of opportunity problem, he said. It too could suffer negative leadership changes after three years. Already there were some opposed to the current softer line to Taiwan. When I asked who, he said elements in the Chinese military and some of China's 300 million "netizens," both confident of China's growing strength and international prestige.

One understands the professor's concern. On the one hand the economic and even social imperative is for Taiwan to seek closer ties to China. People like Ma realize this. But when visiting Taiwan one also senses a popular mood of, if not antagonism, then at least indifference to the mainland neighbor. Long years of island isolation have given the Taiwan people a strong sense of separate identity. Time does not necessarily work in Beijing's favor. Everything could easily go back to square one, with Beijing again having to threaten rocket attacks to keep Taiwan from seeking independence and U.S. hawks threatening retaliation.

Few remember now, but when the Communist government came to power in Beijing in 1949 the U.S. was happy to abandon the defeated Nationalists in Taiwan. On Jan. 5, 1950, President Harry Truman said: "The United States will not pursue a course which will lead to involvement in the civil conflict in China." But the good intentions ended with the outbreak of war in Korea. Taiwan, it was claimed, had to be defended as barrier against communist expansion in Asia, and possibly even as a base for the overthrow of that Communist regime in Beijing, then accused falsely of causing the Korean War.

The result was half a century of strife, suffering, tension and chaos, now only tentatively being overcome. First up were the 1954 and 1958 Taiwan Strait crises, as Beijing sought to recover some offshore islands used by the Nationalists to launch CIA-aided sabotage attacks into China. The U.S. responded by threatening nuclear attack. This led Moscow, then keen for detente with the U.S., to withdraw its nuclear pledge to China.

This in turn led to the Sino-Soviet polemics of the early 1960s, which led many in the West mistakenly to assume that Beijing was so ideologically extreme and aggressive that it had to be stopped through interventions against all leftwing and progressive movements in Asia, beginning with Indonesia (more than half a million dead) then Vietnam (2 million to 3 million dead) and ending up in East Timor (where an estimated one quarter of the population was killed), with uncounted millions killed or maimed elsewhere in between.

Meanwhile, China was reacting with its own disastrous moves — purges of moderates and intellectuals, the 1958-61 Great Leap Forward (some say as many as 20 million starved to death), all culminating in the chaos of the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution triggered at least in part by the way Tokyo's double-dealing over Taiwan led to the demise of pro-Japan moderates in Beijing.

It was a classic example of how once Western policies are set in the wrong direction, events can escalate in even worse directions. Students of Western policies toward the Middle East, Africa and Latin America can find many similar examples.

True, it can be argued we are all better off today because Taiwan in 1949 was not absorbed by a China with post-revolution traumas. Protected by the U.S., Taiwan has gradually evolved into the attractive, prosperous and reasonably democratic society we see today. But there were always other solutions.

The Taiwan people are Chinese, think Chinese and speak Chinese just like any other Chinese people. Everything should have been done to persuade the ruling Nationalists to forget past animosities and deal with mainland China sensibly. Indeed, there is evidence Chiang Ching-kuo, the son of and eventual successor to Chiang Kai-shek, the first Nationalist leader in Taiwan, in 1965 wanted to do just that. But U.S. hawks intervened, preferring to keep the animosity pot boiling.

In 1961 I found myself with an Australian delegation sitting alongside Chiang Kai-shek on deck chairs atop a cliff facing the Taiwan Strait as troops with 27-kg packs were parachuted into the sea below and made to swim ashore. There, Chiang said proudly, is how we will recover the mainland from the communist bandits. Few seemed worried by the bizarre stupidity of it all, or the decades of senseless hostility and suffering that would follow.

Back in Canberra and to hoots of hawkish derision (Canberra's hawks can be even more virulent than the U.S. version, I discovered), I prepared a paper, recently unearthed by researchers, suggesting that if Australia was so worried about China, then one way to ease the tension was to encourage Beijing's exposure to Taiwan's noncommunist model. Finally, that is happening, but almost half a century too late.

Discuss this article

海峡のギャップ縮まる

 最近中国を訪問して、二つのことがはっきり見えた。一つは経済のバイタリティ;最近中国の輸出が下向いてきたと騒いでいる批評家たちは,内需依存経済へシフトしている中国の能力を見落としている。もう一つは、北京のマインドの中で台湾の重要性が大きくなっていること。
 たしかに、台湾はいつも重要だった。内戦で悪名を高くして敗走した小集団が、本国のそばに陣取り、はじめは本国反攻の権利を宣伝、やがて本国も含む全国の代表は自分らだとの権利主張、そして今では独立して本国(中国)の敵であるアメリカと同盟する権利を主張して居座っている、そんな集団がいるとしたら、自尊心を持った政府ならどんな政府も、放置できるものではあるまい。
 だが昨年、協調路線の馬英九が台湾総統に選ばれて以来、双方のプランナーたちは、より緊密な関係を構築しようと鋭意努力してきた。貿易と投資はすでに始動している。先月私が参加した北京における国際教育協力会議の会場で、外国との交流・交換を求める学生や教員たちから断トツの人気を集めていたブースは、台湾のブースだった。
 とはいえ、障害は残っている。台湾の主要野党グループである民主進歩党は、台湾を香港と同じ一国二制度の方向へいざない、最終的には中国が台湾の政策をコントロールするようになる、と批判する。馬総統はこれを否定しているが、私の中国訪問では、中国が固い決意のもとに、台湾からの訪問者を、香港や澳門からの訪問者と同じくくりで別扱いしようとしていることは明らかだった。
 その会議では、異例ともいえるフランクさで、中国人民会議政策立案局の顧問チン・ツァン・ロン教授が一同に話をした。彼は、現在のこのより緊密な協調のためのチャンスの窓は次の台湾選挙までの、あと3年の命かもしれない、その時台湾独立の声が再び高まる可能性があるから、と話した。
 中国もまた、チャンスの窓問題を抱えている、と彼は云った。中国でも3年後にはこの流れに否定的な指導部の交代が起こる可能性がある、すでにいまでも、台湾への現在の柔軟路線に対する反対がある、という。その反対は誰か、と私が質問すると、軍の一部と中国に3億いるネットマニアの一部で、どちらも中国の国力と国際的プレスティージが高まることを確信している人たちだ、と彼は答えた。
 教授の心配は理解できる。一方、台湾にとって中国とより緊密な絆を求めることは、経済的にはもちろん社会的にさえ緊急な命題だ。馬総統のような人はこれがわかっている。だが台湾を訪れると、中国本土の隣人に対する一般大衆のムードは、敵対的とは云わないまでも、無関心だという印象を持つ。長い間島国として離れていたことで、台湾の人々は本土とは別個のアイデンティティを持つに至っている。これは必ずしも時間がたてば中国に有利に展開するという性質の問題ではない。すべてが簡単に振り出しに戻ってしまう、つまり、北京は台湾が独立を目指さないようにロケット攻撃をちらつかせる必要を感じ、アメリカのタカ派はそうなれば反撃必至だぞと脅しをかけるという、とんがった関係に戻ってしまう可能性がある。
 
覚えている人は少ないだろうが、1949年に中国で共産勢力が政権を取った時、アメリカは台湾に敗走した国民党勢力からよろこんで乗り換えた。195015日ハリー・トルーマン大統領は云った、アメリカは中国に内乱をもたらすことにつながるような介入の道は選ばない。、と。だがこの良き意図は、朝鮮における戦争勃発でストップしてしまう。台湾はアジアにおける共産主義の拡大に対する防壁として、またさらには、当時朝鮮戦争を起こしたといういわれのない非難を受けていた北京の共産主義政権を倒すための基地としてさえ、守り抜かなければならない、というのが言い分だった。
 その結果は、いま一時的にその克服の試みが進行中だが、半世紀にわたる戦いと苦難と緊張とカオスだった。まず最初に来たのが、1954年、58年の台湾海峡危機で、CIAに支援された対中国サボタージュ攻撃に発進するために国民党勢力が利用していたいくつかの沿岸諸島を北京が取り返そうとした時だった。これに対しアメリカは、核攻撃も辞さずと脅しをかけた。そのため当時アメリカとのデタントを求めていたモスクワは、中国への核兵器協力の約束を取り下げてしまった。
 それが次には、1960年代初期の中ソ論争へつながるのだが、西側の多くの人は、北京はイデオロギー的に異常に過激で攻撃的であるから、それに歯止めをかけるために、アジアにおけるすべての左翼的、進歩的運動に介入する必要があるというまちがった見解を持っていた。― インドネシア(50万以上の人が殺された)から始まって、次がベトナム(死者200万~300万人)、そして最後は東チモール(全人口の4分の1が死亡)、またこの間に、その他の地域で数百万単位の人々が殺され、片輪にされた。
 一方、この間中国は、自身の国難的動きに追われていた ― 穏健派と知識層の追放、195868年の大躍進(一説によると2000万人が餓死したともいう)。それらすべてが上り詰めたピークが196676年の文化大革命のカオスである。台湾をめぐる東京の二枚舌外交が北京の親日的穏健派を退場に追い込んだことが、少なくともその引き金の一つになった。
 西側の政策が一旦まちがった方向にセットされると、諸々の出来事がさらに悪い方向へ拡大展開することの、これは典型的な例である。中東、アフリカ、ラテンアメリカに対する西側の政策の研究者なら、このような例をほかにたくさん示せるだろう。
 たしかに、1949年に台湾が革命後のトラウマの中にあった中国に吸収されなかったことはわれわれみんなにとってよかったという議論もあろう。台湾はアメリカに守られてゆっくりと魅力的で豊かで適当に民主的な社会に発展した。だが、他の解決の道というのも、常にあったのだ。
 台湾の人々は中国人であり中国人の考え方をし中国語を話すという点で、他の中国人と全く同じだ。過去の反目を忘れ、中国本土と賢いつき合いを続けるように与党の国民党を説得するために、可能なことはすべてやるべきだったのだ。実際、台湾の初代国民党指導者蒋介石の息子で彼の後継者たる蒋経国は1965年まさにそのようなことをしようとした証拠がある。しかしアメリカのタカ派は、反目の火を燃え続けさせる方を好んだらしく、これに介入した。
 
961年私は台湾海峡に望む崖の上で、デッキチェアーに座った蒋介石の横に並んだオーストラリア代表団に混じって、27キロの装備を付けた部隊が、パラシュートで眼下の海へ降下し岸まで泳ぐつく演習を見学していた。そのとき蒋介石は胸を張って、こうして共産匪賊から本土を取り返すのだ、と話した。それらすべてが奇妙で馬鹿げていること、また今後何十年も無意味な敵対関係と苦悩が続くであろうことを憂慮する人は、いそうもなかった。
 キャンベラに戻って、タカ派たちのあざけりの声の中で(キャンベラのタカ派は場合によってアメリカのタカ派より毒性が強いことを発見)、私は一つの論文を用意していた。最近ある研究者によってその論文が発掘されたが、その中で私は、オーストラリアが本当に中国について心配しているのなら、その緊張をほぐす一つの方法として、台湾という非共産化モデルをじっくり観察する機会を北京に与えてやることだ、と示唆した。いまようやく、それが実現しつつあるわけだが、ほぼ半世紀遅すぎた。