Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Barring the people needed

The Calderon affair — the expulsion of a Filipino couple who entered Japan illegally but whose Japanese-fluent daughter was born and raised in Japan — is seen as an indictment of Japan's confused immigration policies. And rightly.

On the one hand, Japan says that with its birthrates at record lows, it needs more people — childbearing females especially. Yet it is busy expelling just the kind of people it says it needs.

The confusion has been around a long time. At the height of the clampdown on illegal foreigners five years ago I got to see the Shinagawa holding center for visa overstayers and others turning themselves in voluntarily. Most of the about-to-be deported were young, fit-looking and attractive people, the majority female. Many were good Japanese speakers. Some had children playing in Japanese with other children.

As a member of the Justice Ministry's immigration reform consultative committee at the time, I tried to ask the immigration officials present what they thought about expelling just the kind of people Japan needed for its population buildup. Blind incomprehension was the kindest response I got. Later, on the seventh floor of the same building where illegals caught by the authorities were being held in tatami-floored cages, I got an answer.

"These people have broken the law," I was told indignantly. "They have to be punished and expelled."

But why not amnesty for those who are clearly well-behaved and of benefit to Japan, I asked.

Amnesty? That would just encourage more lawbreakers, they said.

Japan is not quite the heartless antiforeigner hell of some outsiders' imagination. Provided you obey the rules, visa and residency restrictions are far from draconian. Few nations allow foreigners full ownership of land as Japan does. The effort to provide English- language signs and material for foreigners is impressive. Access to many institutions is open, welcomed even, although this does not stop a small group of overly sensitive foreigners from complaining loudly, and legalistically, every time some damage-suffering bar manager, shopkeeper or bathhouse owner feels that he or she has to keep out badly behaved foreigners.

True, there are times when the Japanese sensitivity to foreigners goes to excess. There was the newly opened Ibaraki golf course back in the "bubble days" that went out of its way to promote a Canadian theme. Maple-leaf-splattered brochures carried photos of attractive Canadian youths who would serve members. But the fine print at the bottom said "no foreigners accepted as members."

On balance, though, the sensitivity factor works more to our advantage than not, which is why so many foreigners find spouses and jobs here, and some even find themselves appointed to policymaking committees. Many other Asian nations, South Korea for example, are more nationalistic and more overtly antiforeign than Japan. But because we know where they're coming from, we accept it. Japan is more unpredictable so we complain.

Much is made of the low numbers of refugees accepted by Japan. But the problem here is pure Catch-22. To apply to be a refugee, you have to be physically in Japan, and to be in Japan you should have a valid visa. If you have a visa saying you came to study or work and then turn around and say you really came to apply for refugee status, ipso facto you have been skirting the law. Even so, the authorities seem reasonably tolerant in trying to help the few who do qualify as genuine refugees.

True, Japan has been notoriously reluctant to bring in people directly from refugee camps abroad. But here Japan does have a problem. As with the Vietnamese who came in the 1980s and the Brazilian nikkei who came under a generous immigration policy earlier, assimilation of unskilled, less-educated people into Japan's difficult culture, economy and language is not easy.

The authorities are right to be wary of foreign, mainly East Asian, crime gangs taking advantage of Japan's weak anticrime precautions.

But why use that to justify the harsh attitudes to those like the Calderon family? Foreigners who have stayed in Japan illegally to work are usually the people least likely to want to commit crimes.

In the Justice Ministry immigration committee, we heard a lot about the problems the United States and Europe have had with their relaxed immigration policies. It is a good point. Convinced of their cultural strength, many Western nations have greatly overestimated their ability to absorb culturally alien foreigners, and now pay the price. But can Japan opt out entirely?

With population decline already hurting the economy, it has no choice but to bring in migrants. Amnesty for "good" visa overstayers and others like the Calderons would have been a start.

To get around the committee concerns, one or two of us suggested a points-based immigration policy similar to that used in Canada and Australia, with particular emphasis on the language ability that would ease assimilation. I also urged automatic work visas for students, Chinese especially, able to graduate from Japanese universities.

And while Japan has a fine culture, some careful foreign input might make it even better — the well-educated Indians currently shaking up math education in Japan, for example. But those and other ideas got little more than the courtesy of mild consideration. Japan seems happy in its cultural isolation, and still thinks it can survive without a sensible immigration policy.

Postscript: Ironically, Emily, the wife of former Justice Minister Kunio Hatoyama, is the daughter of an Australian Occupation-era sergeant, Jimmy Beard, who was able to remain in Japan because he was married to a Japanese national. Indeed, he was forced to remain since at the time Canberra was busily barring entry to Japanese married to Australians.

Later, the ex-sergeant and his family were cruelly satirized by Australian author Hal Porter, who was paid by Canberra in the early 1960s to write about postwar Japan. Porter saw mixed marriages in "racist" Japan as doomed to failure. Meanwhile, Emily's sister, Margery, who has since married into the Bridgestone Tire family, now works tirelessly for Japan-Australia cultural relations.

Discuss this article
必要な人材を阻んで


カルデロン事件 日本に不法入国したとはいえ、日本語堪能な娘は日本生まれの日本育ちであるフィリピン人夫婦の国外追放 は、混迷する日本の移民政策にたいする告発として見られている。確かにそうだ。

 一つには、日本は出生率が未曾有の低さに落ち込み、もっと人口が、とくに出産世代の女性が必要だといっている。ところがまさに、その必要としているような人々を日本はせっせと追放している。

 この混迷は今に始まったことではない。5年前の不法入国外国人追放の最盛期、私は、ビザ期限超過者やその他自主的に出頭した人を処理するための品川待合所を見る機会があった。追放を目前にした人の大半は若く健康的で魅力ある人々で、半数以上が女性だった。その多くは日本語がうまかった。子供連れの人もいて子供たち同士がたがいに日本語で遊びまわっていた。

 当時法務省の入国管理問題懇談会のメンバーだった私は、そこに居合わせた入管の係官に、少子化を正す人口政策にとってまさに必要なこういう人々を追放することを、あなた方はどう考えているかとたずねてみた。わかりません的な無視が、いちばん親切な反応だった。後ほど同じビルの、当局に捕まった不法滞在者が閉じ込められている畳敷きの檻がある7階に上がったとき、その答えが得られた。

 「これらは法を犯した連中だ」と腹立たしげに言われた。「処罰して追放しなければならない。」

でも、行いもよくて、日本にも利益になるような人たちには、どうして恩赦が認められないのか、と私は尋ねた。

 恩赦だって? そんなことをすれば、もっと法破りを増やすだけだ、と彼らはいった。

 とはいうものの、日本は、一部の外部者が想像するような非情で外国人排斥的地獄とはちょっと違う。法に従う限り、ビザや在住制限は厳格というにはほど遠い。日本のように、外国人に土地の完全所有を認める国は少ない。英語の標識や外国人向けの資料などはなかなか充実している。諸組織への加入もオープンで、歓迎さえしている。マナーの悪い外国人の被害に苦しんだバーのマネジャー、店主、銭湯の主人などが彼らを締め出そうとするといつでも、一部の過敏すぎる外国人は声高に法的に文句をつけることはあるにしても。

 たしかに、日本の外国人敏感症が行き過ぎた時もある。バブル盛んな時、わざわざカナダ式をテーマにして新しくオープンした茨城ゴルフコースがあった。楓の葉を散らしたパンフレットには、メンバーにサービスするカナダ人若者たちの写真があった。ところが下の方の細かい活字では、外国人はメンバーになれませんと書かれていた。

 とはいえ、総じて、日本人の敏感性がわれわれにとって不利に働くより有利に働く場合の方が多い。だからこそそんなにも多くの外国人が日本で配偶者や仕事を見つけてきたし、中には政策立案委員会の委員にまで任命されているのだ。他の多くのアジアの国では、たとえば韓国、日本よりもっとナショナリスティックでよりあからさまに反外国的だ。ただ、それが何に由来するのか理由がはっきりしているので納得できる。ところが日本は推測がつきにくいだけに、文句を言われる。

 日本が難民受け入れの数が少ないという批判が多い。だがここでの問題は、キャッチ22の問題にすぎない。難民の申請をするには、実際に日本にいることが条件となる。そして日本にいるためには有効なビザが必要だ。だが、あなたが日本で勉強するあるいは働くために日本に来たと書かれたビザを持っている場合に、開き直って実際は難民資格をもらうために来たと宣言したとすると、そのこと自体、法をかいくぐったことになる。そんな場合でも当局は、もし本当に難民としての資格がある人に対しては、かなり温情的に手を差し伸べようとするようだ。

 たしかに日本は、国外の難民キャンプから直接に難民を受け入れることを嫌うとして評判が悪い。しかし日本はこの点で問題を抱えている。80年代に日本へ来たベトナム人やそれ以前に寛大な移民政策で受け入れられた日系ブラジル人の場合に見られるように、未熟練で教育が比較的少ないような人々を日本の複雑な文化、経済、言語の体制の中に同化させるのは、簡単ではない。

 日本の防犯意識の弱さに付け込んで、外国人、主として東アジアの犯罪集団が入国するのを当局が憂慮するのは当然だ。

 でもなぜ、カルデロンの一家のような人たちに対する過酷な態度を正当化するために、それが口実に使われるのか。働くために日本に不法滞在することになった外国人はふつう犯罪を犯す気持ちのいちばん少ない人たちだ。

 法務省の入国管問題理懇談会ではアメリカ、ヨーロッパの入管政策が手ぬるかったために生じた問題点についていろいろ聞かされた。それはよい指摘だ。多くの欧米諸国が、自分たちの文化的優位に確信があるために、文化の違う外国人を社会に同化させる能力を過信していたのだが、今その代償を払わされている。そうはいっても、日本は完全に身を引いていることができるのか。

 人口減少がすでに経済にダメージを与えているとき、移民を入れる以外に方法はない。

よい期限切れ滞在者やカルデロン一家のような人々に恩赦を与えるのをその第一歩とすればよかったのだ。

 懇談会の心配を和らげるために、若干の委員がカナダやオーストラリアで実施しているような、とくに社会同化を助ける語学力に重点を置いた、ポイント制による移民政策を示唆した。また私は、日本の大学を卒業できた学生、とくに中国人学生に自動的に就業ビザを出すことを強く提案した。

 日本には立派な文化があるとはいえ、慎重に外国の要素を注入することは、さらによいものを生み出すかもしれない 教育の高いインド人たちが現在日本の数学教育に揺さぶりをかけているのもその一例だ、とも。しかし、あれこれのアイディアを提案しても、礼儀上ちょっと関心を示すだけでそれ以上の反応はなかった。日本は文化的に孤立していても満足なようだし、合理的な移民政策などなくても生き残れるといまだに考えているらしい。

 追記:皮肉なことに、前法務大臣鳩山邦夫の妻エミリーは、占領軍時代のオーストラリア人軍曹ジミー・ビアードの娘である。ジミーは、日本人と結婚していたために日本に残ることができた。実際、当時キャンベラはオーストラリア人と結婚した日本人の入国を禁止するのにいそがしかったのだから、彼は日本に残るより仕方がなかったのだ。

 後に、この元軍曹とその家族はオーストラリア人作家ハル・ポーター(60年代初め戦後の日本についてものを書くようにオーストラリア政府から補助を受けた)によって冷酷な風刺小説に仕立てられた。ポーターは、人種主義日本において国際結婚は失敗に終わる運命だと見ていた。その一方、エミリーの姉妹マージェリーはブリジストンタイヤ一族の御曹司と結婚し、現在日本とオーストラリアの文化交流のために精力的に働いている。