APEC's purpose is missing

Each year we have to ask the same question as world leaders drag themselves across the globe, taking days from their crowded schedules, simply to hand out platitudes on the importance of free trade, the environment or some other trendy topic of the day.

True, the same question could be asked about other fairly meaningless summits — the Group of Eight of the world's allegedly most important industrial economies (which still manages to exclude China), ASEM (the Asia-Europe forum) and many others. But APEC (the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum) with its convoluted membership and lack of obvious purpose really should raise eyebrows. As someone peripherally involved from the start, maybe I can throw some light.

A Japanese economics professor, Kiyoshi Kojima, formerly of Hitotsubashi University, is correctly seen as the father of APEC. In the mid-1960s I was a member of his university research group. At the time, Japan's leftwing was arguing that Japan had no choice but to normalize relations with its communist neighbors to the west — China, North Korea and the USSR — since they had provided the markets and resources crucial to Japan's prewar development. Kojima set out to prove them wrong.

Instead, he argued, Japan could survive quite well by looking east to the non-communist nations of the Pacific. He proposed a Pacific Free Trade Area — PAFTA — whereby the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand would open their markets to Japanese goods in exchange for Japan turning its back on its communist neighbors. And Japan could continue to protect its farmers.

PAFTA was an obvious nonstarter. But Kojima was not dismayed. His idea still had legs. For many Japanese, including even some progressives, the idea of a postwar Japan making a fresh start looking out toward the advanced Westernized nations of the Pacific rather than having to look backward to the dark impoverished Asia, which had caused Japan such trouble in the past, was attractive.

Kojima moved quickly to have PAFTA replaced by PAFTAD — a forum where academics could discuss something called Pacific Free Trade and Development, even if their governments were reluctant to talk about pie-in-the-sky PAFTA plans.

PAFTAD was soon supplemented by PBCC (an equivalent forum for businessmen) and the quasi-official PECC (Pacific Economic Cooperation Council) where both the academics and the businessmen could come together for more discussions, this time with bureaucratic and political endorsement.

Meanwhile, Japan's Foreign Ministry was toying with various schemes such as ASPAC (Asia-Pacific Community) that would see the noncommunist Asian nations brought together in some vague way. In the event, they all foundered on vagueness and Asian suspicion of Japanese leadership intentions.

Undeterred, Tokyo, with the indefatigable Kojima still at the helm, began to push for something that would allow the wreckage of ASPAC, together with the floundering PAFTAD, PBCC and PECC , all to be amalgamated into some entity enjoying full government backing. It was to be called APEC. That would be in 1989.

From the beginning Kojima's fingerprints were heavy. For example, to retain his original Pacific Basin concept, APEC has had to include Latin Americans — Mexico, Chile, Peru. Their relevance to Asian trade and development was, and remains, minimal. Indeed, Asian manufacturing interests were, and remain, antagonistic to Latin American interests. Meanwhile the very relevant Asian communist nations, including China, remained firmly excluded.

The problem of APEC sponsorship remained. Tokyo was anxious not to repeat its ASPAC experience where Asian suspicions of Japan had caused so much trouble. So it turned to Australia.

Then Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke, never reluctant to seek global headlines, was easily persuaded to be the front-runner. And Canberra was very happy to gain kudos as seeming to have promoted an Asian initiative, even though it seems to have done little more since then other than provide a platform for endless conferences on a range of fairly irrelevant issues.

True, APEC has since collected many member nations, including even the once detested communists in China, Vietnam and Russia. But this simply reflects the way governments will always jump at the chance to join any international grouping. They are always afraid of being left out of something, even if no benefit is obvious. This has been especially true of Moscow.

APEC is a testament to the way international groupings develop a life of their own long after they have fulfilled their original purpose. The G-8 grouping, originally meant to bring Western powers and Japan into an anticommunist economic and political alliance, is another example even though its original protagonist — Moscow — is now a member.

Hopefully the rise of China and the growing clout of ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) will eventually put APEC out of its misery as an Asian grouping. And if free trade is so important, the current reliance on the World Trade Organization and on bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs) seem much more relevant.

Discuss this Article
見えてこないAPECの目的

 毎年、世界の指導者が自由貿易、環境その他いま流行のテーマについて月並みなことをいうだけのために、多忙なスケジュールを数日割いて、地球の隅々から集まってくるのを見ると、いつも同じ問いを発せずにはいられない。

 確かに、同じ問いを発したいようなあまり意味のない諸々のサミットは他にもある
 いわゆる世界の最重要先進8カ国というG8(いまだに中国は除外されている)、ASEM(アジア欧州会議)その他多数。だが、APEC(アジア太平洋経済協力会議)は、その膨れ上がったおかしなメンバー、確固とした目的の不在が際立っており、真にひんしゅくモノだ。私はAPECをそのスタート時点から脇から眺めていたものとして、少しライトを当てることができるかもしれない。

日本の経済学者で前一橋大学小島清教授は、いみじくもAPECの父といわれている。私は
1960年代半ば、彼の大学の研究グループのメンバーだった。当時日本の左翼は、日本の西の共産主義の隣人である中国、北朝鮮、ソ連は、戦前日本の発展に不可欠だった市場や資源を提供してきた国であり、彼らと国交を回復するより他に道はないという議論をしていた。そのとき小島は、それは間違っていると証明しようと立ち上がった。

 彼の主張は、そうではなく日本は東へ、太平洋地域の非共産主義諸国へ目を向けることで十分うまくやっていける、というものだった。太平洋自由貿易地域
 PAFTAを提案し、そうすれば共産主義の隣国に背を向けた日本に対し、その代償としてアメリカ、カナダ、オーストラリア、ニュージーランドが日本製品へ市場を開放するだろうといった。そして日本は自国の農家を守り続けることができるというのだった。

 PAFTA
はあきらかに不発の運命だった。だが小島はひるまなかった。彼のアイディアはいまでも足がある。多くの日本人は、進歩的陣営の一部も含めて、戦後の日本が新しく船出するイメージとして、過去に日本に多大な面倒をもたらした、暗く貧しいアジアを振り返ることを余儀なくされるよりは、西側先進国を手本にするほうが魅力的だった。

 小島は急きょPAFTAの代りに、PAFTAD
、各国政府が絵に描いた餅のPAFTA計画について議論することに乗り気でなかったことなどお構いなしに、 学者が「太平洋自由貿易と開発」なるものについて討論するためのフォーラム をつくりだした。

 PAFTADはまもなく、PBCC
(財界人対象の同類の組織)、また半公共的なPECC(太平洋経済協力会議)という付随組織を設け、今度は官僚や政界の後押しを得て、学者と財界人が一緒になって討論を広げることになった。

 一方日本の外務省は、非共産主義のアジア諸国をある漠然とした方法でまとめようとするASPAC(アジア太平洋協議会)など、様々な計画をもてあそんでいた。だがその曖昧性、日本のリーダーシップ意図へのアジア諸国の懐疑心のために、それらはみな沈没してしまった。

 それにもめげず、日本政府は、依然として疲れを知らぬ小島を舵取りとして、ASPACの破片から、じたばたもがいているPAFTAD、PBCC
,そしてPECCのそれを混ぜ込んで、全面的に政府の支援による何か一つの統合的化合物をつくろうと躍起になりはじめた。それがAPECと呼ばれるものになる。1989年のこと。

 最初から小島の指紋が濃厚だった。例えば彼の最初の環太平洋というコンセプトを保つために、APECは、メキシコ、チリ、ペルーというラテンアメリカ諸国を含めなければならなかった。アジアの貿易と開発にとってラテンアメリカがどんな関わりがあるかといえば、当時もいまも、ごく薄い。実際、アジアの製造業の利害は、当時もいまも、ラテンアメリカの利害と対立している。その間、中国を含め、非常に関係の深いアジアの共産主義国はしっかりと排除されたままだった。
 APECのスポンサー問題は残った。日本政府は、日本に対するアジアの懐疑心が多大なトラブルを引き起こしたASPACの経験を繰り返したくなかった。そこでオーストラリアへ目を向けた。

 当時のオーストラリア首相ボブ・ホークは、世界的な注目を集めたい野心は少なからずあったので、この計画の先導者になるよう簡単に説得されてしまった。そしてオーストラリア政府は、アジアン・イニシアティブの振興といった風な名声を得て嬉々としていた。実際にはそのとき以来、一連のあまり有効でないテーマに関する果てしない会議へ足場を提供した以外は、あまり貢献したとは考えられない。
 たしかに、APECはそれ以来、中国、ベトナム、ロシアといった、昔は嫌われていた共産主義国さえも含め、多くの参加国を集めてきた。だがこれは単に、諸政府がどんなものであれ、国際的グループなるものに跳びついた結果である。彼らは常に、何かから外れることを恐れている。たとえそれが何の役に立つか見えないときでも。特にロシア政府はそれがはっきりしている。

 
APEC は、国際的グルーピングが、その最初の目的を果たした後も生き延びて一人歩きしている例の最たるものだ。もう一つの例はG8グループで、もともと西側諸国と日本が反共的経済政治同盟を結成するためにつくられたもの。結成時の敵 モスクワ がいまはメンバーになっている。

 そこで、中国の隆盛とますます影響力を強めているASEAN(東南アジア諸国連合)が、将来的にはアジアのグルーピングとしてのAPECの窮状を救うことを期待しよう。
そして自由貿易がそれほど重要なら、現在のWTOや二国間貿易協定(諸々のFTA)に頼る方がよほど適切ではないか。