Monday, April 30, 2007

Crucial role for trade barriers

Latin America's textile industries are in trouble. They cannot compete with cheaper imports from China.
Textile industries are labor-intensive. They do much to create the infrastructure and work ethic needed for other manufacturing industries to develop. For this reason they are usually the crucial first stage in a nation's industrialization. The demise of Latin America's textile industries is especially tragic since it will not only cripple further industrial progress; it could also trigger social crises, given the serious unemployment and resultant crime problems in the area -- problems I have been made only too aware of on recent visits to Peru and Ecuador.
In short, these nations should be allowed to impose whatever trade barriers are needed to keep those Chinese textiles out. But the free-trade experts, in the International Monetary Fund, World Bank and elsewhere, say no. No free trade, no loans to help cope with economic crises. But if the crises are the result of free trade preventing industrial progress? For the Latin Americans it is an ugly Catch 22 situation.
True, there are times and places where free trade can be useful in forcing non-competitive producers out of business. But a textile industry in a developing economy? It deserves all the help it can get.
Even stranger is the way the free-trade people until quite recently largely ignored the fact that the Chinese yuan currency was undervalued by at least 20 percent (some say 40 percent). That this represented an unfair 20 percent subsidy for all Chinese exports to Latin America, giving importing nations a perfect right, even by free-trade textbook standards, to impose a 20-percent tariff, never seemed to register.
As the free traders saw it, currency valuations were the result of free-market forces. So the exchange rates were fair, by definition. If China's cheap yuan meant the destruction of some Latin American industries, so be it. The Latin Americans should go off and develop other industries.
Only now is the yuan undervaluation problem beginning to get attention. But it could be too late. For a developing nation, a lost industry usually remains lost; it is very hard to revive the infrastructure needed to support it. As this column predicted several years ago, trying to compete with China's low wage and rapidly improving infrastructure advantage will be almost impossible unless its currency is forced to appreciate quickly and greatly.
If the Latin America situation is bad, it is much worse in Africa. The 50th anniversary of Ghana's independence saw much recrimination over Africa's inability to progress industrially. The answer, as ever, was more aid from the West. But as an excellent BBC documentary recently pointed out, this aid is destroying even local agriculture. The West will only provide that aid if the Africans allow free import of EU and U.S. surplus agricultural goods. Local politicians go along with these suicidal policies so they can get their kickbacks from the aid funds. Meanwhile cheap and imported consumer goods, from China especially, rule out any chance of developing manufacturing industries.
There is a simple answer to this problem of industrial development in a backward economy and it can be found in Thailand. Forty years ago Thailand was almost as retarded as most African nations today. But today it has a serious industrial economy exporting to the world. How did that happen? Since I was there at the time let me tell you something that the free-trade textbooks won't tell you.
At the time Thailand had to rely almost entirely on exports of rice to buy manufactured goods. Even shirts had to be imported, mainly from Japan. Then one day its government decreed that while fabric could continue to be imported freely, shirts and other garments would have to be made in Thailand. The Japanese garment exporters were not happy. But since Thailand was a big market and the extra cost of processing imported fabric was not high, they bit their lips and set up processing factories knowing they would be protected from cheaper imports of finished goods.
Next move, a few years later, was to ban the import of fabric, but not the yarn needed to make fabric. Rather than lose their garment factories, the Japanese bit their lips again and established fabric weaving factories. And so it went on, all the way down the production line till Thailand eventually had a full-scale, competitive textile industry able even to export, sometimes to Japan.
Next move was to block car imports but encourage a car-assembly industry by allowing free import of car-making materials and parts. Then imports of some materials and parts were also blocked. Then more materials and parts were blocked, and so on. The foreign exporters, mainly Japanese, were in effect "blackmailed" into local production in order to protect their earlier investments. But they also knew that enough Thais would continue to buy cars to sustain a car industry, even if production costs were higher than abroad.
Today Thailand has a respectable car industry, also able to export. And because it has textile and car industries, it now also has the skills, work ethic and infrastructure needed for a range of other advanced industries.
There are two morals to this story. One is that all nations, and not just the East Asian miracle economies with their initial work ethic advantages, can create industrial societies. But they need to do it gradually, Thai style, forcing foreign firms to replace exports with local production.
The other moral is the need to get rid of our Western free-trade dogmatists. The World Bank with its current scandals and mistakes would be a good start.

Discuss this Article
貿易障壁の大事な出番

 中南米の繊維産業が困難に直面している。中国からの安い輸入品に対抗できない。
 繊維産業は労働集約的である。繊維産業は経済発展に必要な他の製造業を発達させるためのインフラ、良い働く倫理を作り上げることに大きく貢献する。そのため繊維産業は一国の工業化のために欠かせない第一段階となるのが普通だ。中南米の繊維産業の崩壊が特に悲劇なのは、それに続くべき工業化を成り立たなくさせるという理由からだけでない
;。繊維産業の崩壊が引き起こす深刻な失業と治安の悪化が社会危機の引き金になりかねないからだ。─ そのことを、最近ペルーとエクアドルを訪れて、はっきりと見せ付けられた。
 つまり、これらの国に対し、中国の繊維製品を締め出すためのあらゆる貿易障壁を設けることが許されるべきなのだ。だが
IMF、世銀ほかの自由貿易エキスパートたちの答えはノーだ。自由貿易ができないなら、経済危機に対処するためのローンもだめだという。けれども、産業発展を阻んでいる自由貿易が経済危機の原因だとしたら、どうするか。中南米にとって、これは醜いキャッチ22状態だ。
 確かに、時と場合によっては、自由貿易が競争力のない生産者を断ち切るという良い役目を果たすこともある。だが、開発途上国の繊維産業についてはどうか。できる限りの支援を与えるべきである。
 さらにおかしいことに、自由貿易論の連中は、中国の通貨元が少なくとも
20%(40%という人も)低く評価されていたことを、つい最近まで殆ど無視していた。これは南米へのあらゆる中国輸出に20%という不公平な助成金が付けられていたと同じだ。この事実は、輸入国側に20%の関税をかける完全な権利を与えるが、 自由貿易教科書でも認められているこの権利を、彼らはまるで見過ごしていたかのようだ。
 自由貿易論者によると、通貨評価は自由市場の力学の結果ということだった。だから為替レートは原則として適正だという。仮に中国の元安のために中南米のいくつかの産業が崩壊するとしても、しかたがない。中南米諸国はあきらめて他の産業を開発すべきだというわけだ。
 今ようやく元安問題が注目され始めた。とはいえ遅すぎた可能性もある。開発途上国にとって一つの産業が崩壊すると、それが永久に崩壊したままになるのが普通だ;それを支えるために必要なインフラを再生させることは非常に難しい。このコラムで数年前私が予想したように、中国の安い賃金と急改善を見せるインフラのアドバンテージと競争することは、自身の通貨を急激に大幅に評価し直さない限り、ほとんど不可能だ。
 中南米の状況が悪いとすれば、アフリカはさらに格段に悪い。ガーナ独立
50周年にあたって、アフリカにおける工業化の立ち遅れについて声高に議論された。それに対する答えは相変わらず西側の援助をもっと増やせというものだ。しかし、あるすばらしいBBCドキュメンタリーが指摘したように、この援助が、現地農業さえも破壊してしまう。西側が援助を与えるのは、アフリカ諸国がEUやアメリカから余剰農産物を自由貿易で輸入する限りにおいてだろう。現地の政治家は援助資金から分け前をもらえるので、この自殺行為的政策を受け入れる。一方、特に中国から、安い輸入品の消費物資が入ってきて、現地の製造業を育てようとするあらゆるチャンスを消してしまう。
 この、開発途上国における産業開発という問題に簡単な答えがある─ それはタイの経験に見られる。
40年前にはタイはほとんど今のアフリカの大半の国とおなじくらい後進的だった。ところが今では、世界に向けて輸出する押しも押されぬ工業経済に成長した。なぜそうなったのか。その当時現地に居合わせたので、自由貿易教科書が教えないことを私から話そう。
 当時タイは、ほとんど米の輸出一本に頼って、製造業製品を買っていた。シャツでさえ、主に日本からの輸入に頼るほどだった。ところがある日、政府が、布地は自由貿易で輸入を続けるが、シャツなどの繊維製品はタイ国内で作る、という法律を作った。日本の繊維製品輸出業者は面白くなかった。だが、タイは大きな市場だし、輸入布地を製品に加工する余分なコストは高くないし、外国のより安い製品の輸入からは守られることを知った上で、歯を食いしばって、加工工場を建てた。
 政府の次の一歩はその数年後、布地を作るに必要な糸の輸入はそのまま続けるが、布地の輸入を禁止することだった。自分が建設した加工工場を失うよりはと日本人は、再び歯を食いしばって、織物工場を建てた。そのようにして、生産ラインを順次さかのぼっていき、ついにタイは終始一貫した競争力ある繊維産業を育て上げ、一部を日本へ輸出するまでになった。
 次の段階は、自動車の輸入を止めること、そして自動車組み立てに必要な資材や部品を自由に輸入させて、車のアセンブリー工業を育てることだった。続いて、一部の資材や部品の輸入を止めた。さらに次には、その他の資材や部品の輸入も止めた、等々と続く。外国の輸出業者は、(主に日本の業者だが)、実質的には
脅しをかけられて、すでに行った投資を守るために、現地生産への移行を誘導された。だが彼らとしても、生産コストがよそより高いにしても、タイでは自動車産業を支えるに十分な車の購買力が持続するであろうことを知っていた。
 今日タイでは、質の良い自動車産業が育ち、輸出もできるほどになった。そしてタイに繊維産業、自動車産業が生まれたために、他の一連の高度な産業に必要なスキルや働く倫理、インフラも生まれた。
 この物語には二つの教訓がある。一つは、働く倫理というアドバンテージを特別固有にもつ東アジアの奇跡的経済に限らず、どの国でも工業社会をつくる力をもっているということ。ただし、そのためにはゆっくりやる必要がある。外国企業を、輸出でなく、現地生産に切り替えさせるタイ方式で。
もう一つの教えは、西側の自由貿易ドグマチストを排除する必要があること。目下スキャンダルとあやまちにたたられている世銀が、その良い手始めかもしれない。