Trump vs. loose economics
BY GREGORY CLARK
FEB 15, 2017


Fashions change. From the miniskirt we moved to the drape dress. From obligatory neckties we now have cool-biz. And whatever happened to those loose socks?

Ditto for loose economic theories. My economics education began back in the days when protectionist polices were the norm. After all had not Germany and the United States relied heavily on such policies to create their industrial empires? And was not Japan already booming ahead because it protected its industries? The rationale then was as valid as it is now: Certain industries crucial to the industrial base should be protected to create the foundation for further industrial progress.

But somewhere along the line they discovered some industries were getting protection they did not deserve. Ugly trade wars were also breaking out. So a new generation of economists emerged armed with blackboards and diagrams that proved the universal merits of free trade. Only newly emerging industries — “infant industries” — could qualify for protection, we were told, grudgingly.

At the time the word “free” also had a political, anti-communist cachet. So soon it was not just trade that had to be freed, but currencies also. Before long “protectionism” was a dirty word, to be snarled at anyone, no doubt a “communist,” who sought even the minimal protection needed for an important industry to survive. Even the European Union’s move to protect and develop its own aviation industry — Airbus to compete with Boeing — had to be condemned even though the competition between the two has led to obvious benefits for the world aviation industry. Dogma has strange effects on people.

Now we see yet another fashion switch with U.S. President Trump complaining about currency manipulators and insisting on across-the-board protection for U.S. industries threatened by low-cost producers like China. And to some extent he could be right.

The currency of a developing nation is often undervalued relative to its production efficiency; Chinese production line assemblers can be as efficient or even more so than their U.S. equivalents, but at current exchange rates they will be paid only a fraction of the U.S. wage. There should be some mechanism — flat rate surcharges on cross-border transactions, for example — to allow advanced economies to avoid the damage caused by this imbalance. There should also be mechanisms to curb the harmful effects of the violent currency swings we see today.

Protectionism gets much of its bad name from the examples of weak economies trying to industrialize by massively protecting all import-competing industries. A vicious cycle gets under way. Costs rise across the economy. Exporting becomes even more difficult than before. Trade balances collapse. The currency has to be devalued. Costs rise even further across the economy as a result. Latin America — Argentina in the past and now Venezuela — is exhibit No. 1.

But it does not have to be that way. As I wrote on
these pages earlier, Thailand relying on intelligent and highly targeted protectionism to force or encourage foreign, mainly Japanese, direct investment has come from nowhere to become a global exporter of vehicles.

Any other nation, even the so-called basket-case economies of Africa and the Middle East, could do the same. The only condition is for them to have a reasonably sized domestic market within their borders, combining with surrounding nations if needed. But the moment they try to do this the advanced nations begin the free trade rant that has kept these nations in their baskets for so long and with little chance of escape.

The U.S. under Ronald Reagan skillfully used the threat of quotas and surcharges to revive its domestic car and other industries under threat. Tokyo screamed protectionism. But it bowed to the inevitable and started to build its factories in the U.S. Today it is very glad it did that.

But if a nation wants to go the protectionist route, policies have to be carefully thought out and targeted. Australia is a pathetic example of how things can go wrong. It abandoned most of its low- and mid-tech industries under the free trade dogma that said people losing employment in industries hit by imports would automatically move to high-tech industries. Australia would become the Scandinavia of the South Pacific, exporting computers and other advanced gadgets to the rest of the world.

When that did not happen it decided it would rely on high automobile tariffs to become a car industry powerhouse. All it got was a range of inefficient producers struggling to survive and now whittled down to the point of extinction. To preserve at least some manufacturing employment it is now into massively subsidizing a nascent submarine industry. Meanwhile Japan by very slowly phasing out protection, even for low-tech industries, has given its industries time to evolve and expand. Toray and Teijin, once exclusively textile producers, are now major world producers of carbon fiber, for example.

The free traders also fail to realize the difference between protection for consumer and for producer goods. Tariffs on imported consumer goods act as little more than a tax on domestic consumers, hopefully to encourage or protect areas of the economy seen as important for employment, cultural or other reasons. Many taxes are imposed for much less worthy causes. Problems only arise when tariffs are imposed on producer goods since this raises costs across the economy, Latin American style.

Trump gets a bad rap for his dislike of trade blocs. Yet even here he may have a point. The North American Free Trade Association may have done wonders for the Mexican and Canadian car industries, but it has devastated Detroit. Meanwhile efficient, large-scale U.S. corn producers have crippled Mexico’s rural economy, and maybe encouraged the rural unemployed into the drug industry.

Trade liberalization is a worthy goal. But it should come about through carefully crafted bilateral deals rather than blunderbuss multilateral agreements where weak economies are thrown willy-nilly into competing with stronger economies — laid-back Greeks being forced to compete with disciplined Germans within the EU, for example. Here Trump with his anti-TPP hang-ups could come closer to the truth than the academics with their blackboards.







トランプ対日和見経済学
BY GREGORY CLARK
FEB 15, 2017


流行は移り変わる。私たちはミニスカートからドレープドレスを好むようになった。以前はネクタイをしなくてはならなかったが今ではクールビズもある。あのルーズソックスはいったいどこへ行ったのか。

経済理論にも同じことが言える。私の経済学の勉強は保護主義政策が基軸だった時代に始まった。結局ドイツとアメリカは自らの工業帝国を創るためにこのような政策に頼ってきたのではないか。加えて、日本は国内市場をすでに保護していたことによって好景気に向かっていたのではないか。当時の論理的根拠は今でも同様に有効である。つまり、その国の産業基盤に必要不可欠な特定の産業は、さらなる産業の成長のための基礎を作るために保護すべきである。

しかし、その過程のどこかで彼らは保護に値しないいくつかの産業までもが保護されてしまったことに気がついた。そこで、新時代のエコノミストたちが黒板と図表を持って現れ、自由貿易の普遍的な利点を証明した。唯一新たに現れた産業「幼稚産業」は〜嫌々ながらであるが、保護に値する、と言われた。

当時「自由」という言葉は政治的な反共産主義の御旗であった。したがって、やがて自由化されなくてはならなくなったのは貿易だけではなく、通貨もそうであった。そのうちに「保護主義」は、「共産主義者」はもちろん、生き残るために重要な産業にとって必要な最低限の保護を求めた人たちさえも非難する汚れた言葉になった。自らの航空機産業保護発展のためのEUの動きでさえーボーイングと競争するアエバスはーその両者の競争は世界の航空機産業にとって明白な利益につながったのに、避難されなくてはならなかった。ドグマは人々に奇妙な影響を与える。

今私たちはもう一つの流行の変化を見て取る。アメリカの大統領ドナルド・トランプである。彼は為替操作国に文句をつけ、中国のような低コスト生産者に脅かされるアメリカの産業の全面的保護を主張する。そして彼はある程度理にかなっているかもしれない。途上国の通貨はその国の生産性に照らして低く評価されていることがよくある。中国の生産現場の組立工はアメリカの組立工と比べて効率が同じくらいか、またはそれ以上であるのに、中国人が受け取る賃金はアメリカ人と比べてほんのカケラほどだ。何らかの仕組みがあってしかるべきだー例えば、すべての越境取引への均一料金上乗せだーこの不均衡によってもたらされる先進国経済への悪影響を回避するために。今日散見される急激な為替変動の悪影響を抑える何らかの仕組みもあったほうがいいだろう。

保護主義の評判が悪くなったのは、すべての輸入競争にある産業を保護することで産業として成り立つようとしたことによって不景気になった事例がいくつかあったからである。悪循環が起こることになる。経済全般にわたってコストが上昇する。輸出は以前よりももっと困難になる。貿易の均衡は崩壊する。通貨価値は切り下げを余儀なくされる。結果として経済全般にわたってコストはさらに上昇する。ラテンアメリカーかつてのアルゼンチン、今はベネズエラが代表的な例だ。

しかし必ずしもそうならない場合もある。以前この紙面の寄稿で私が書いたとおり、タイは主に日本を中心とした外国からの資本流入を促進するため、賢く目標の高い保護主義を頼りに、ゼロからスタートし、自動車の世界的な輸出国となったことだ。

他の国も、中東アフリカのいわゆる無力な開発途上国であっても同じことができる可能性がある。彼らにとって唯一の条件は程よいサイズの国内市場を国境内に持ち、必要なら周辺諸国と統合することだ。しかし、こうした国々がこれを行おうとする瞬間に先進国が自由貿易の合唱を唱え始め、長きにわたってがんじがらめにされこの状況から逃れるのはほぼ不可能になるのだ。

ロナルド・レーガン政権下のアメリカは、危機に瀕する国内の自動車やその他の産業を復活させるために、巧みに割り当てと割増料金の脅しを使った。日本政府も保護主義を訴えた。しかし日本は避けられない事態に屈服し、アメリカに工場を建設し始めた。日本がこれを行ったことは今になって大変良かったと言える。

しかし、もしある国が保護主義の道を行きたいなら、政策を入念に練り、的を絞らなければならない。オーストラリアは事態悪化の悪い手本である。オーストラリアは、低中程度の技術を要する産業のほとんどを、輸入に押される産業で仕事を失う人たちは自動的にハイテク産業に移行するという自由貿易のドグマのもと放棄してしまった。

オーストリアはコンピューターなどの先進機器を世界に輸出し、南太平洋のスカンジナビアになるところだった。そうならなかったのは、オーストラリアが自動車産業の集積地になるために高い自動車関税に頼ると決めたからである。結局オーストラリアが手に入れたのは、生き残ろうとしてもがく非効率な生産者たちであり、彼らは今やずたずたになって瀕死の状態である。

少なくともいくらかの製造業の雇用を維持しようと、オーストラアは今、初期の潜水艦産業に多額の補助金をつぎ込んでいる。日本が非常にゆっくりと保護主義から脱却していく間に、ロウテク産業も含め自国産業に、進化拡大する時間的猶予を与えた。例えば、東レと帝人はかつては繊維専業メーカーであったが、今や世界を代表する炭素繊維メーカーである。

自由貿易主義者は消費者保護とメーカー製品の保護を区別することにも失敗した。輸入消費財への関税は国内消費者への税金同様にわずかなものだが、雇用や文化などの理由から重要と目される経済分野の活性化や保護につながることが期待される。多くの税金は何かの理由のために課されている。卸売製品に関税が課された時にだけ問題が発生するのは経済全般にわたってコスト増となるからで、これがラテンアメリカで起こったことだ。

ドナルド・トランプは貿易圏が嫌いであることから酷評されている。しかし、ここでも彼にも一理あると言える。 NAFTA(北米自由貿易協定)はメキシコとカナダの自動車産業に驚くべき効果をもたらしたかもしれないが、デトロイトを破壊してしまった。一方で、効率的で大規模なアメリカのとうもろこし生産者はメキシコの地方経済をダメにしてしまい、おそらく地方の失業者は麻薬ビジネスに手を染めるようになってしまった。

貿易自由化は価値のある目標だ。しかし、それは入念に形作られた二国間の取り決めによってもたらされるもので、経済的に弱い国々が否応なしに経済的に強い国々との競争にさらされる大括りな多国間協定によってではない。例えば、EUの中で気楽なギリシャ人が規律正しいドイツ人と競争させられてしまっている。というわけで、反TPP(環太平洋経済連携協定)の悩みを持つトランプは、黒板を持った学者よりも真実に近いかもしれない。