Targeted protectionism can aid developing economies
BY GREGORY CLARK
NOV 28, 2016


There was much irony in the fact that Peru this year came to host the recent annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.

APEC began life as the 1970s brainchild of some anti-communist Japanese and Australian National University academics. They wanted a trade bloc that would encourage Japan to see its future in the Pacific rather than look west to communist China and the Soviet Union. But to prove the Pacific orientation they had to include Peru and some other distant Latin American nations of little global economic importance, while nearby China, now so important to the Japanese and Australian economies, was deliberately excluded.

The Latin Americans continue as members. But APEC, which has dropped any pretence of trying to be a free trade bloc, now has to include Beijing to try to give its annual talk-fests some kind of meaning and status. Even more ironically, APEC now has to pay serious attention to China’s proposed Asia-Pacific trade bloc, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, at the very moment that the U.S.-proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, designed as an anti-China successor to APEC but with free trade teeth, begins to implode.

An even sadder irony was the sight of Peru’s recently elected president, Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, embracing strongly the free trade slogans that dominated this latest APEC meeting. I have visited Peru many times. Like other Pacific Basin nations, including Australia, its industries long enjoyed protection not just from government policies but also from being distant from the industrial centres of the United States and Europe. It had even then a large, well-educated middle class. It was developing a range of nascent manufacturing industries — textile and metal-working especially. By the rules of economic growth it should by now be on a par with mid-level European nations.

But today, many of those former manufacturing industries are not even nascent. Free trade policies have caused most to be swamped by cheap Asian imports. The economy now depends heavily on food exports and the wildly fluctuating prices of its mineral exports.

Worse, the inability to employ a rising population, many flooding into the cities seeking work, has spawned a crime wave — not quite as bad as in Brazil, Colombia (where a Japanese student was recently shot to death for trying to foil street thieves), Mexico or some other Central American nations perhaps, but bad enough. Most of my acquaintances there have been robbed at least once, some at gunpoint. Fortunately, Peru’s vigorous media try hard to prick consciences by highlighting social problems. But corruption remains rife, the police are impotent and the politicians show little concern. Peru at one stage even tried forced sterilization as a way to stop the flow of unemployables into the cities.

Hope rose with the recent election of the principled, Western-influenced Kuczynski. But to date the improvement has been slight. As in most Latin American nations, the upper classes seem to have little interest in the squalor at the bottom of their societies. Yet a society where you cannot walk safely down the streets is not a society.

There has long been a simple answer to this growing nightmare — Thai-style targeted industrial protection. Protectionism got much of its bad name from the open-slather variety that did such damage to many Latin American nations in the past — Argentina especially, which once had a living standard equal to Australia’s. The protectionist technique of trying to develop local industries simply by banning the import of foreign manufactures will leave you, as it did in Argentina, with a range of inefficient local industries clamouring for more protection to survive. But Thailand has used targeted protectionism to create a range of efficient industries able to export around the world. How?

It began with the textile industry, some 40 years ago. Japanese textile makers had competed fiercely for a share of the Thai shirt market, but the government suddenly ruled that imports were banned and shirts had to be made locally. However, it said, the import of materials needed to make the shirts would be allowed. Thailand soon had a range of Japanese-financed shirt-making factories, many with local partners. The government then began to rule that those imported materials also had to be locally produced — first the yarn, then the fabric and then finally even the cotton needed for the yarn. At each stage the Japanese investors faced a dilemma — abandon their factories or begin local production using needed technology from Japan. Most chose to continue. Eventually Thailand, with its advantage of cheaper labor and Japanese know-how, was able to produce competitively a range of textile goods for export, even to Japan.

Thailand repeated this targeted protectionist policy with its car industry, and today it has an efficient full-fledged car industry. Compare this with Malaysia, which foolishly tried to create a car industry simply by imposing high taxes or bans on the import of cars. According to a Wall Street Journal article:

“Malaysia once harboured ambitions to be the Southeast Asian regional automotive manufacturing hub. But it lost in the race to attract foreign carmakers after Thailand — now dubbed the Detroit of Asia — showered investors with generous (export) incentives.”

But Malaysia also had those export incentives, and they did not work. They worked in Thailand because its policies had already allowed it to create an efficient car industry as a base for exports. Today those policies would be banned by the anti-protectionist dogmas now rampant — dogmas ironically created in part by Malaysia’s failures.

The Thai example could be applied worldwide, even in some of the basket-case economies in Africa and the Middle East. The formula is simple. If you are a small, weak economy, first form a trade bloc with neighbours to create a market large enough to attract investors. Then begin to ban the import of low technology goods needed by that market. From then on do as Thailand did.

At each stage there will be some temporary price increases for local consumers, and the investors will complain how they are being blackmailed into local production in order to protect what they have already invested. The anti-protectionist free traders will complain even more. But the final result could be the creation of industries able to absorb unemployment, reduce crime and produce goods that can sell around the world.
戦略的保護主義は途上国経済の一助となりうる


ペルーが今年のAPEC(アジア太平洋経済協力会議)年次総会のホスト国となった事実は実に皮肉なことだ。

  APECは、数人の反共産主義の日本人学者とオーストラリアの国立大学の学者たちの発想によって1970年代にスタートした。彼らは日本に、西側の共産圏である中国やソ連よりも太平洋に将来を見出すことを促すため、貿易圏を作りたかった。しかし、太平洋への指向性を証明するため、彼らはペルーやその他の世界への経済的影響力がほとんどない遠く離れたラテンアメリカの国々を含めなければならなかった。一方で、地理的に近く、今では日本やオーストラリアの経済にとって非常に重要な中国は意図的に外された。

そのラテンアメリカの国々は今でも加盟国である。しかし、APECは自由貿易圏であろうとする看板を下ろし、毎年のお話会合に何らかの意味や権威を与えるために中国を巻き込もうとしている。さらに皮肉なことに、APECは中国が提唱しているアジア太平洋貿易圏、地域包括的経済協定(R-CEP)に真剣に注意を払わなくてはならなくなった。アメリカ主導の、自由貿易指向でありながら反中国としてAPECの後継として編み出された、TPP、環太平洋経済連携協定が内部崩壊し始めたまさにこのタイミングにおいて、である。

 さらに悲しい皮肉は最近選出されたばかりのペルーの大統領の姿だ。ペドロ・パブロ・クチンスキは自由貿易の信念を強く持ち、直近のAPEC会合も自由貿易の話で持ちきりだった。私は何度もペルーを訪問したことがある。他の太平洋沿岸諸国と同様に、オーストラリアもそうだが、ペルーの産業は、政府の政策によってだけでなく、アメリカやヨーロッパの工業中心地から距離を保つことによって長年保護されてきた。ペルーは当時でさえ、教育水準の高い幅広い中間層を持っていた。そして、各種の初期の製造業、とりわけ繊維産業と金属加工産業を育成中であった。経済成長の基準ではペルーは今頃はヨーロッパの中間レベルの国々と肩を並べるほどになっていたはずであった。しかし、今日、これら前述の製造業は初期段階ですらない。自由貿易政策が引き起こしたのは、ほとんどが安いアジアの輸入品に圧倒されてしまったことだった。ペルー経済は今は食品輸出と、価格変動の激しい鉱物輸出に頼りすぎている。

 さらに悪いことに、増加する人口を雇用する受け皿もなく、多くの人が職を求めて都市部になだれ込み、次々と犯罪を引き起こしている。——ブラジル、コロンビア(先日日本人学生が路上でのひったくりにあい、犯人を捕まえようとして撃ち殺された場所だ。)メキシコといった中米諸国ほどひどくはないが、十分悪い。私の知人のほとんどは、少なくとも一度は物取りにあい、ピストルを突きつけられた例もあった。幸いにも、ペルーの頼もしいメディアは社会問題に焦点を当てることで良心の呵責に訴えようとしている。しかし、腐敗は蔓延したままで、警察も無力で、政治家の関心も薄い。ペルーはある時、雇用に適さない人たちの都市部への流入を食い止めるために、強制的な妊娠中絶さえいっかい試みた。

 節操のある西側の影響を受けたクチンスキ氏の最近の当選で期待が高まった。しかし、改善を決定づけるには物足りない。多くのラテンアメリカ諸国でそうであるように、上流階級の人々は自分の社会の下流階層の不潔さにあまり関心がない。しかし、安全に街中を歩けない社会は社会とは言えない。

 この募る悪夢に対する明快な答えは以前からあったーータイ式の、戦略的産業保護だ。保護主義は汚名を着せられているりゆうは過去において多くのラテンアメリカ諸国に多くのダメージを与えた。特にアルゼンチンはかつてはオーストラリアと同等の生活水準であった。外国製品の輸入を単純に禁止することによって自国の産業を守ろうとする保護貿易主義者のやり方では、アルゼンチンでそうであったように、非効率な国内産業が生き残りのためにさらなる保護を求めるようになるだけである。しかし、タイでは戦略的保護主義によって世界中に輸出できる効率的な産業を生み出した。ではどのように?

 まず着手したのは繊維産業であった。約40年前のことである。日本の服飾メーカーはタイでワイシャツ市場のシェアをめぐって激しく争っていた。しかしタイ政府は突然輸入を禁止し、ワイシャツを国内で製造する決まりとした。しかしながら、タイ政府はワイシャツ製造のために必要な材料の輸入は許可することとした。程なくしてタイには日本資本によるワイシャツ工場が立ち並び、その多くは地元企業との合弁であった。その後、政府はそれらの輸入していた材料も地元で作らなければならないとしたーー最初は織糸、そして布地、そしてついに、織糸を作るために必要な綿まで国内製造にしたのである。それぞれの段階で、日本の投資家はジレンマに直面したーー彼らの工場を見捨てるか、日本の技術を生かした地元製造を始めるか。多くは継続を選んだ。ついには、タイは安い労働力と日本のノウハウを強みとして服飾製品を競争力を持って輸出用に製造できるようになり、日本にさえ輸出した。

 タイはこの戦略的保護主義政策を自動車産業においても行った。そして今日、タイは本格的な効率の良い自動車産業を持つに至った。これをマレーシアと比較してみよう。マレーシアは馬鹿げたことに単に輸入自動車に高関税をかけたり輸入禁止にしたりして自動車産業を育成しようとした。ウオールストリートジャーナルの記事によれば、

「マレーシアはかつて東南アジア地域の自動車製造の中心地になる野望を抱いていた。しかし、外国の自動車メーカーを誘致する競争においてタイに敗れたーータイは今はアジアのデトロイトとよばれるがーー投資家たちに気前よく輸出奨励金を与えたのだ。

しかし、マレーシアにも同様の輸出奨励金があったが、機能していなかった。輸出奨励金は、タイでは輸出基地として効率的な自動車産業を作る政策が許可されていたので、機能したのである。今日、これらの政策は今はやりの反保護主義のドグマによって禁止されてしまいかねないーー皮肉にもマレーシアの失敗を一つの教訓として作られたドグマである。

 タイの例は世界中に適用しうる。アフリカや中東の一部の何も吸収しないかに見えるザル経済にさえも。公式は単純だ。もし、自国の経済が小さくて弱いなら、まずは投資家を惹きつけるのに十分に大きなマーケットを形成するために、周辺国とともに貿易圏を作る。そして、その市場に求められる低い技術の製品の輸入を禁止し始める。そうしてから、タイがしたようにすれば良い。

 それぞれの過程で地元経済のいくらかの一時的な物価上昇があるだろうし、投資家たちは彼らがすでに投資したものを守るために彼らがどれだけ地元産業にたかられているか、不平を言うだろう。反保護主義の自由貿易をする者はさらに文句を言うだろう。しかし、最終結果は、失業を吸収でき、犯罪を減らし、世界中で売れるモノを生産することができる産業の創生かもしれないのだ。


グレゴリー・クラークは元オーストラリア政府外交官で経済学者に転身。