Expected behavior in a school jungle

That large clucking sound you are hearing is the sound of breakdowns in Japan's over-regulated education system forcing some very large chickens to come home and roost in the Kasumigaseki premises of Japan's conservative education ministry, MEXT.
We now discover that the ministry, which fusses in detail over school textbooks, anthem singing and flag-raising ceremonies, claims not to have known anything about the blatant flouting of its rigid and detailed curriculum directives to Japan's high schools.
For years many schools have ignored those directives in order to concentrate on teaching only the few subjects usually needed for university entrance exams -- Japanese and English especially. Subjects such as world history, also compulsory under ministry directives but not compulsory in entrance exams, are bypassed because teaching those subjects would cut time available for key entrance-exam subjects.
Already the finger-pointing is under way. The high schools are being blamed for ignoring ministry directives; already one high school head has committed suicide under the strain. Parents too are blamed -- for excessive zeal in wanting to push their children into elite universities.
But under the present system created by the ministry, presided over by the universities and abetted by society in general, can parents and high schools be expected to behave otherwise? In a nation where the future of students and the prestige of both their schools and their parents hang on the name and fame of the university students manage to enter, could there possibly be any other result?
When president of Tama University I made English an elective rather than compulsory subject in our entrance exams, with the promise of extra and better English teaching after entry. My aim was to encourage students seeking entry to study a wider range of subjects, science especially since it is largely ignored in many entrance exams. But the education ministry was unhappy about the move. They were even more unhappy when I said high-school English did more harm than good and tried to abolish English entirely from entrance exams.
They need not have worried. Since English was virtually compulsory in high schools, most ended up selecting it anyway. My move did little to change the distorted entrance-exam system.
On the education reform commission set up by former Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi in 1999, some of us tried hard to push other reform ideas, only to be opposed or ignored by the ministry bureaucrats.
One reform I sought strongly was the concept of provisional university entry. Students who had just missed out in university entrance exams would be given a second chance as provisional entrants. If their study results at the end of first year were satisfactory they could then become regular students.
Not only would this ease some of the entrance-exam pressure; it would also do something to break down the current "leisure-land" reputation of university education in Japan where students connive to do the minimum of study needed for graduation which is virtually guaranteed anyway. Some students at least would be under pressure to study hard and get good results, even if only for one year.
But even though we got the provisional entry concept into the commission's final report, few universities were willing to tamper with their traditionally rigid pass-fail entrance-exam system.
The main exception happens to be my present university, in Akita. There up to 10 percent of entrants are "provisional," and at the end of the first year their results are often better than those of the regular students, even though in our case the latter are also under pressure to study hard. Incentives work, even in Japan.
Another reform proposal, strongly backed by former Education Minister Nobutaka Machimura, was to allow early university entry for bright 17-year-old students, instead of having them wait round to meet the compulsory 18-year-old entrance age requirement.
Over strong opposition from ministry bureaucrats age 17 entry was legalized soon after. But to date almost no university has taken up the new system, mainly because the ministry can easily sabotage it by insisting that high schools should not allow early graduation. And Machimura's very useful suggestions that the required entry age for primary school be lowered from the present age 6 (almost age 7 for children born just after April 1) was also ignored.
In the late '90s, the ministry very reluctantly approved an early-entry experiment for science and math students run by Chiba University. One physics student I helped to select ended up at age 21 as a doctorate student at the prestigious Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- something inconceivable even for the brightest Japanese students today. Sadly that situation is likely to continue for a long time (the experiment was soon terminated). Meanwhile, Japan will continue to fret over its lack of top scientific talent.
In the past, Japan's rigidly controlled education system had some egalitarian merits. But today it clearly cannot cope with the needs and demands of a new generation.
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and many other conservatives seem to think that changing the Basic Education Law will somehow improve things. But that is an ideological document, with little bearing on education mechanics. (The Obuchi commission wasted much time discussing the Law and, contrary to later claims, full consensus was not reached.)
Until something is done to free up the workings of the system, Japan will remain an education jungle.

Discuss this Article
混迷する学校教育への対応策は

 いま聞こえてくるのは、規制でがんじがらめの日本の教育システムが音高く壊れている音であり、日本の保守的な文部科学省
(文科省)自身が作り出した大きな厄介ごとがその本拠地霞ヶ関に戻ってきてしまいどっかり居座ってしまった、いわば自業自得の図である。
 今目にしているのは、教科書の記述、国家斉唱・国旗掲揚セレモニーに細かく立ち入り大騒ぎしている文科省が、自分たちが日本の高校に対して行っている硬直的で仔細にわたる指導要領が大々的にないがしろにされていた事実について何も知らなかったと言い張っていることだ。
 何年にもわたり多くの高校が、大学入試のために通常必要とされる数科目
 とくに 国語や英語 のみを教えることに集中する結果、これらの命令を無視していた。指導要領では必修とされているが入試では必修ではない世界史のような科目は、入試のカギを握る他の科目のための時間を減らすからという理由で、避けられていた。
 犯人探しはすでに始まっている。文科省の命令を無視したということで、高校が責任を追求されている。その圧力に耐えかねて、すでに校長が一人自殺している。親もまた、子どもをエリート大学へ入れようとする努力が過熱しているということで、責任ありとされている。
 だが、文科省自身が作り上げ、大学が監視し、社会全体が許している現在のシステムの中にあって、親や高校は他にやりようがあるだろうか。生徒の将来が、また学校と親双方の名誉が、子どもが入れる大学の名前と評判にかかっているような国で、これ以外の結末はありえようか。
 私は、多摩大学学長時代に、入学後にさらに余分によりよい英語教育を施すという約束の上で、入学試験では英語を必修でなく選択に変えた。目的は、入学志望者がより広範な科目
 とくに多くの入試で広く無視されている理数系科目 を勉強することを願ってのことだ。だが文部省(当時)はこの動きに難色を示した。現在高校で教えている受験英語は百害あって一利なしだから、入試から英語を完全にはずしたいと私が提案したとき、文部省はさらに難色を深めた。
 彼らは心配する必要はなかったのだ。英語は高校では事実上必修なので、多くの受験生は結局は英語を選択した。私の試みは歪んだ入試制度を改善するにはあまり役立たなかった。
 
1999年小渕恵三首相が設けた教育改革国民会議で、私を含め数人の委員は他の改革も推進しようと懸命に努力したが、結局は文部省官僚に反対され無視された。
 私がとくに強く推進したかった改革は、大学への暫定入学というコンセプトだ。大学入試でスレスレのところで不合格になった生徒を、暫定入学生として受け入れ第二のチャンスを与える。一年生に在学させ年度末試験で成績がよければ、正規の学生として受け入れ進級させるというもの。
 これは受験地獄の過熱を多少とも和らげるだけでなく、現在の日本の大学教育の
レジャーランド”(勉強は卒業に必要な最小限にとどめることを狙う 実際は卒業は保証されているも同然なのだが) 批判に応える第一歩になる可能性をもつものだ。暫定入学制では少なくとも、学生にたとえ1年間でもまじめに勉強してよい成績を上げるためのプレッシャーが生まれる。
 この暫定入学というコンセプトは、国民会議の最終報告書には入れられたものの、伝統的な厳密な合否ラインへのこだわりを変えようとする大学は少なかった。
 主な例外は、私が現在勤める秋田県の国際教養大学だ。ここでは入学生の
10%までは暫定的入学だ。1年後の学年末試験では、彼らはしばしば正規学生よりよい成績を上げる われわれの大学では正規学生もまじめに勉強しなければならない仕組みなのだが。インセンティブは、日本でさえも有効だ。
 もう一つの改革提案、前文部大臣町村信孝が強く押した提案は、大学入学を、現在の年齢条件
18歳まで待つことなく、頭のよい生徒は17歳でも入学を可能にすることだった。
 文部官僚の強い反対を乗り越え、
17歳入学はその後まもなく合法化された。ところが、新しいシステムを採用した大学はほとんどゼロだ。主な理由は、文科省が、高校は早期卒業を許すべきでないという主張を強めることで、この制度を容易に骨抜きにすることができるからだ。かくて町村の非常に有益な提案、小学校入学の必要年齢を現在の6(41日直後に生まれた子どもはほとんど7)以下に下げるべきだという提案は、これまた無視された。
 
1990年代末文部省は非常にしぶしぶながら千葉大学が行った実験、理数科学生の早期入学、を認めた。私が選考で協力した一人の物理学専攻の学生は21歳で誉れ高いMITの博士課程まで進んだが、これは今の日本ではたとえ飛びぬけた秀才の学生でも考えられない。残念ながらこれはまだ長く続きそうだ。(その実験はまもなく終了してしまった)。その間は日本は理系のトップクラスの逸材不足を嘆き続けることになろう。
 過去には、日本の規制の厳しい教育制度には、平等主義的ないくつかの長所があった。だが今日、これでは新しい世代のニーズと時代の使命に対応できないのは明らかだ。
 安倍晋三首相と多くの保守陣営人は、教育基本法を改めれば事態は改善すると考えているようだ。だがあれはイデオロギー的な文書に過ぎず、教育のメカニズムとはほとんど関係ない。
(小渕国民会議はこの問題の議論に多くの時間を無駄にした上、後でいわれていることとちがい、全員一致は得られなかった)
 この制度の縛りから自己解放するために何らかの手を打たない限り、日本は教育ジャングルであり続けるだろう。
(筆者は前東京の多摩大学学長、現秋田県国際教養大学副学長。著書に「なぜ日本の教育は変わらないのですか」東洋経済出版社2003ほか)