Sudden switchbacks mark Canberra’s ties with Tokyo
BY GREGORY CLARK
AUG 3, 2014

The “Odd Couple” was the title of a long-running TV comedy in the 1970s about two divorced men, Felix and Oscar, who come to share a Manhattan apartment. Felix is neat and tidy. Oscar is sloppy and casual. The clash of lifestyles entertained the audiences for years.

The Japan and Australia relationship seems similar. Both are fairly loveless in Asia; Japan is currently arguing with every one of its immediate neighbours and Australia does little better.

Both cling to the United States for emotional support. The ups and downs of their relations over the years have been impressive.

Australia got the ball rolling when its notorious anti-Asia White Australia policy led it to deny Japan’s claim for racial equality at the 1919 Versailles Peace Conference.

Japanese militarists used this racist denial to justify the anti-Western policies that led to the 1941-45 Pacific War, in which Australia was a major victim.

That in turn led to a belligerent Australia trying at the 1951 San Francisco Peace Conference to have Japan stripped of all territories claimed by others, the southern Kurils (now called the Northern Territories) claimed by Moscow in particular. Canberra argued with some percipience that any disputed territory claims left undecided would be used to encourage a revival of Japanese revanchism. It also demanded and got a special treaty with the U.S., the ANZUS Treaty, to defend itself if and when Japan turned militarist again.

But the ANZUS ink was hardly dry when Canberra decided that the real enemy in Asia was China, not Japan. Canberra went on to condemn Beijing as being responsible for the Vietnam War — for using Hanoi as its “puppet” in its drive south toward Australia between the Pacific and Indian oceans. It set out to encourage a sometimes cautious U.S. to get even more involved in Vietnam.

There was also the bizarrely secret 1964 attempt to get Moscow involved, with an Australian foreign minister traveling all the way to the Kremlin to convince the Soviet leadership that since China had already shown its expansionism against Soviet Sinkiang (sic), Moscow should join the West in preventing further Chinese expansionism in Vietnam. (Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin had to educate him on how Sinkiang had long been part of China, that there was no way Moscow would withdraw its support from the “brave Vietnamese people fighting U.S. imperialism” and that it wished only that China would do more to help.)

The next move was to help create APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) designed originally as an anti-China trade bloc in Asia (for details see
Life Story Chapter 5). That was followed by Canberra’s weird attempt to ban Australia’s participation in the all-important 1971 ping-pong diplomacy designed to open China to the outside world.

Fortunately some of us were able to persuade the Australian team to ignore the ban and go to China. The publicity for the trip combined with Beijing’s warnings of trade retaliations during the visit helped the progressive Labor Party under Gough Whitlam finally gain power in 1972 and offer long-denied recognition for Beijing.

But this meant that Japan could again be the target for suspicion. Working in Canberra in 1975, I saw close up how our hawks were able to convince the Whitlam government that an innocuous Japanese proposal for a treaty of friendship and closer business relationships was in fact a devious Japanese plot to take over Australian resources.

That, combined with Australia’s growing resources nationalism, put relations on the back burner until a conservative government came to power in 1976. But even then there were problems. A Japanese proposal for its elderly to be allowed to retire to Australia was condemned as yet another Japanese attempt to infiltrate the nation.

Relations have continued up and down ever since, with a Japanese ambassador to Australia claiming publicly that white Australian attitudes still permeated Australia’s attitudes to Japan, and with Tokyo axing proposals for a uranium enrichment plant and Multi-Function Polis, which would have done much to revive the stagnant South Australian economy

Now, following Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to Australia in July, we have been told that both nations have entered something called a “special strategic relationship.” Tokyo wants allies for its China-containment policies.

Specifically it wants support for its Senkaku Islands confrontation with China — a confrontation that it seems deliberately to have provoked by reneging on its 1972 agreement with Beijing to shelve dispute over ownership.

Canberra, under its previous government headed by the Chinese-speaking Kevin Rudd, had tried to steer a mid-course between Beijing and Washington. Now it vigorously supports the stronger Japanese military posture in Asia, which it so purposefully set out to deny at San Francisco in 1951 with its formerly strong support for having Japan’s war and military renouncing Article 9 inserted in Japan’s postwar Constitution. Canberra today says Japan is not the militaristic Japan of the past. It approves the moves to allow Japan to engage in “collective self-defense,” forbidden by Article 9.

But has Japan changed?

There was a reason for Article 9 to be imposed on Japan and not postwar Germany. There was something special in the Japanese makeup that encouraged the especially brutal and insane militarism from which Australia, more than most at San Francisco, had suffered.

What Canberra should have said is that Japan has a nation-tribe emotionalism and malleability that allows people easily to be persuaded in directions decided by the national mood.

The wartime mood had allowed brutality and irrationality. Postwar, it had encouraged a strong pacifism and gentleness. Today we see yet another shift in the ease with which Tokyo can use territorial and abductee disputes for a military-oriented mood.

As in prewar years, those who appeal to reason to counter those moods are easily ignored, ostracized or worse. Japan has not changed. But at least we usually know how and where Tokyo is headed. It is the Felix in the odd couple.

With Canberra it is often impossible to find either rhyme or reason.

Why should it be going so far out of its way to jeopardize its crucial trade relationship with China, now much greater than that with Japan?

And why the ability to switch so suddenly from anti-Japan to anti-China to suspicion of Japan and then back to pro-Japan and anti-China? Relations with its other main Asian neighbor Indonesia are equally bumpy.

At base, Australians are either suspicious of Asia, or apathetic, even to Japan (the exception is the military, which never misses a chance to set up another agreement with Japan).

As I write, there is not a single Australian media person covering Japan, apart from the official Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Even the Murdoch press, which was loud in its support for Canberra’s pro-Tokyo shift, has pulled its regular correspondent out of Tokyo.

Every now and then Canberra announces yet another official inquiry to promote nonofficial relations with Asia, language training and study especially. But within a year the proposals are forgotten. Young Australians wanting to get involved with Japan still have to rely on their own efforts.

The Australia-Japan foundation which I helped to establish in 1975, has been allowed to run down. It is now headed by an ex-bureaucrat unable even to speak Japanese.

The Abe visit resulted in a proposal to set up a Tokyo University chair of Japan-Australia studies. But we have seen all this before.

To show Canberra’s special interest in Japan, a special scholarship in the name of former Prime Minister Paul Keating was set up in 1995. It would allow a rising young Japanese academic to do postgraduate research at the Australian National University and serve as a future bridge for economic studies between the two nations. The result? The extraordinary selection of a quite unqualified secretary from a small Australian office in Tokyo whose activities in Japan the selection people wanted to disrupt.

The young lady disappeared on arrival in Australia, yet today none of the organizations involved at the Tokyo or Canberra end want to admit to any responsibility for, or even knowledge of, an affair carrying the name of a former prime minister. But no doubt Oscar would understand.


キャンベラ・東京関係は急転換が特徴

「おかしなふたり」というテレビコメディーが70年代長い人気を誇ったが、それは、マンハッタンのアパートで同居しているフェリックスとオスカーという二人のバツイチ男の物語。フェリックスはきれい好きで几帳面、オスカーはだらしなくていいかげん、二人のライフスタイルのぶつかり合いが、長年にわたって視聴者を楽しませた。

日本とオーストラリアの関係もこれに似ている。どちらもアジアでは好かれていない。日本は目下、全ての隣国とけんか中だし、オーストラリアも似たようなもの。

どちらも、心情的拠り所としてアメリカにしがみついている。ここ数年この二国の関係のアップダウンは、なかなか興味深い。

はじまりは、オーストラリアが悪名高い反アジア的な白豪主義政策でもって、1919年のベルサイユ平和会議で、日本が求める人種的平等を拒否したときに遡る。

この人種的平等の拒否を理由に、日本の軍国主義者は反欧米主義政策を正当化し、194145年の太平洋戦争に至るが、その戦争では、オーストラリアがおもな犠牲者となった。

そこで次には、ひどく怒っているオーストラリアが、1951年のサンフランシスコ平和会議で、他国からクレームが出ている日本の全領土、とくにモスクワが求めた南千島列島(現在北方領土と呼ばれる)を、日本から取り上げさせようとした。キャンベラは、その際、未解決の領土問題を残せば、それが日本の復讐の復活につながる、と、かなり先見性のある主張をした。またオ-ストラリアは、日本がふたたび軍国主義に復活したとき、自分を守るために、アメリカとの特別な条約ANZUS条約を要求し、それを実現させた。

ところがANZUZ条約調印のインクがまだ乾かないうちに、キャンベラはアジアにおけるほんとうの敵は中国だ、日本じゃない、と決め込んだ。キャンベラは、ベトナム戦争は北京の責任だ── 中国は太平洋とインド洋の間、オーストラリア方面に南方進出のためにハノイを傀儡として利用している── と北京糾弾を開始。オーストラリアはまた、時には慎重だったアメリカを煽って、さらに深くベトナムに介入するように、背中を押した。

また1964年には、モスクワをも仲間に引き入れようとする奇怪な秘密の画策があった。オーストラリア外相がわざわざクレムリンまで赴き、ソビエト指導者たちに、中国はすでにソ連領の新疆まで拡張主義を広げているので、モスクワも、欧米と一緒になって、中国の拡張主義を阻止するために協力すべきだ、と説得しようとしたのである。(ソ連首相アレクセイ・コスイギンは、新疆はもう長く中国の一部であること、モスクワはアメリカ帝国主義と戦っている勇敢なベトナム人の戦いの支援をやめる気はさらさらない、中国がもっと支援を強めることこそ願っている、と、オーストラリア外相にレクチャーしたのである。

次の行動は、APEC(アジア太平洋経済協力)の創設のための努力で、これはそもそも、アジアで反中国ブロックを作るために企画されたもの(この詳細についてはライフ・ストーリーの第5章を参照)。次に来るのが、1971年、中国を外の世界へ開く重要な転換点となった画期的なピンポン外交で、その際、オーストラリア・チームの参加を禁じようとする、キャンベラの不可思議な試みがあった。

幸いに、私は、その禁止を無視して中国へ行くようにオーストラリア・チームを説得することに成功。その訪中が一大ニュースとなったこと、またその旅行中に訪中団が宣告されたオーストラリアへの貿易制裁も辞さないという北京の決意、が追い風となって、1972年ゴフ・ホイットラムの下で進歩的な労働党がついに政権を取り、長く禁じられていた北京の承認を実現した。

だがこうなると、今度は日本がまた、オーストラリアの猜疑心のターゲットになる番だった。1975年にキャンベラで仕事をしていて、私が目の当たりにしたのは、われわれのタカ派が、ホイットラム政権を説得して、日本が提案していた無害な友好と経済関係の協定について、実はこれはオーストラリアの資源を乗っ取ろうとする日本の邪まなたくらみだ、と納得させることに成功したことだ。

これが、オーストラリアで勢いを増しつつあった資源ナショナリズムとあいまって、日豪関係はほったらかし状態に。それが1976年に保守政権が出現するまで続いた。だがその時でさえ、問題があった。日本の高齢者がオーストラリアへ移住引退するのを可能にしようという日本の提案が、これまたオーストラリアへ侵入するたくらみだと非難された。

それ以後の関係は、アップダウンが続いた。駐豪日本大使が、オーストラリアの対日態度には白豪主義的態度がいまだ根深い、と書いて批判するという出来事もあった。また東京はウラニウム精錬プラントと多機能ポリスの計画の中止もあった。それは実現すれば、停滞する南オーストラリアの経済を活性化させるのに大きな貢献をしたに違いないものだった。

いま、7月の安倍晋三首相の訪豪に続いて、この二国は特別な戦略関係と称するものに入った、と教えられた。東京は中国封じ込め政策のための仲間を必要としている。

とくに日本は、尖閣列島を巡る中国との対決で、支持を必要としている。── その対決は、この所有権については棚上げしようという1972年の北京との約束を否定することによって、日本が意図的に起こした対決と見えるのだが。

キャンベラは前政権で、中国語を話すケビン・ラッド首相のリーダーシップの下で、北京とアメリカの中間のコースを取ろうと試みた。いまキャンベラは、アジアにおける日本の軍事的姿勢を熱心に支持しているが、1951年サンフランシスコでは、オーストラリアはあれほど強い意志でそれを否定しようとし、日本の憲法に戦争と軍事力廃棄の9条を入れることを強く支持もした。今日キャンベラは、いまの日本は過去の軍国主義的日本とはちがう、という。憲法9条が禁じているいわゆる集団的自衛に従事することを日本に許す動きも認めている。

日本は変わったか?

日本に対しては憲法9条の条項が付けられたのに、戦後ドイツにはなかったのには、特別な理由がある。日本の心理には、特別に暴力的な狂気的な軍国主義を鼓舞するに至る何か特別なものがあった。そのために、オーストラリアは苦しめられた。だからサンフランシスコで強硬になる理由があった。

キャンベラが主張すべきだったのは、日本は国民部族的な情緒主義と変わりやすい性格があり、それが簡単に国全体のムードで決定づけられた方向へ国民を突き動かす結果になる、ということだった。

その戦時ムードがあの暴虐と不条理を生み出したし、戦後は、同じ国民ムードが強い平和主義と優しさを育てた。今日われわれが目にするのは、またふたたびムードの変化、その中で領土や拉致の紛争が簡単に軍国的ムードに変わりうる動きだ。

戦前と同じように、こうしたムードに対して理性を呼びかける意見はかんたんに無視され、排斥され、果てはもっとひどいことになる。日本は戦前と同じだ。だが少なくとも、東京がどんな風にそしてどんな時に動き出すか、われわれには通常わかる。東京は「おかしなふたり」のフェリックスだ。

キャンベラはどうかというと、その動機は皆目見当がつかないことがしばしばだ。

なぜキャンベラは、日本貿易よりはるかに大事な中国貿易を、わざわざ危険にさらそうとしているのか?

また、突然反日から反中国へ、日本猜疑心から親日本反中国へいきなり変身する能力はいったいどこから?アジアで他の主要な隣国であるインドネシアとの関係も、同様にデコボコ道だ。

基本的にオーストラリア人は、アジアに猜疑心を持つか、無関心かのどちらかだ。日本に対してさえそうだ。(軍部は例外で、日本とのまた新しい協定を作るチャンスを決して逃さない)

こう書いている現在、日本をカバーしているオーストラリアのメディアは、一つもない(公的なオーストラリア放送協会は別として)。キャンベラの親日シフトを熱く支持したマードック・プレスさえ、常駐記者を東京から引上げた。

キャンベラは折に触れ、アジアとの非公的/民間関係を振興しようと── とくに言語教育や研究を── 公けに呼びかけている。しかし一年も経たないうちに、その提案は忘れ去られる。日本と関わりを持ちたいと考える若いオーストラリア人は、個人の努力に頼る以外に方法がないのが現状だ。

1975
年に私が設立に加わった豪日基金は、尻すぼみになったまま。その基金はいま、日本語も話せない元官僚が長を務めている。

安倍訪問で日豪研究のための専任教授を東京大学に置こうという提案がされた。しかしこうしたことはみな以前にもあったことだ。

日本に対するキャンベラの特別な関心を示すために、1995年に前首相ポール・キーティングの名前で特別奨学金が誕生した。それによって、オーストラリア国立大学で、日本の学者の卵が大学院教育を受け、将来二国間の経済研究の橋渡しを務める事ができるはずだった。

結果はどうだったか? オーストラリア側が活動を妨害したがっていた東京のある小さなオーストラリア人事務所から、資格不十分な一人の秘書を選ぶという異常な人選となった。その女性はオーストラリアに到着後行方がわからなくなった。にもかかわらず、東京とキャンベラの関係機関(東京の大使館やオーストラリア当局)は誰も責任を認めないばかりか、前首相の名を冠して行われたこの事業の成り行きについて知識もないありさま。だが、オスカーなら、このいきさつがきっと分かるはずだ。