Contradictions over Ukraine
BY GREGORY CLARK
March 10, 2014


Western criticisms of Russia’s move into Ukraine’s Crimea region reek of double standards. In the first place, Moscow was simply moving to regain control of a pro-Russian territory it had rather generously handed over to Ukraine back in 1954 when conditions were very different.

Its move is criticized as a breach of international law and a violation of Ukraine sovereignty. So the arbitrary 1954 Soviet move was in accord with international law and sovereignty? Besides, Western powers have often moved much less politely and with much less justification to take over territories belonging to others.

The contradictions over Ukraine are even greater. Much of what is Ukraine today would never have existed if not for the creation of the Soviet Union. The czars had decreed it was part of Russia and saw it as the cradle of Russian language and culture. It was the early Soviets who decided that minorities should be allowed to have their own republics and autonomous regions.

So there was irony in seeing Ukrainian protesters pulling down the statues of Lenin, the man who had given Ukraine its freedom, even if it was only administrative freedom under overall Soviet control.

Arbitrarily included in that administrative unit was a large slab of purely Russian population concentrated mainly in the east. Indeed it was so pure that in the 1960s I was able to drive through Ukraine from Moscow to the Black Sea without feeling I had even left Russia. Only in the west, where Polish influence was strong, did one see signs of a distinct culture and language, and even that owed its origins to Russia.

In the capital, Kiev, the Russian language was dominant, though subsequent Soviet cruelties and oppression had pushed some to embrace an anti-Russian, Ukrainian nationalism. (I too was a minor victim, being dogged constantly by KGB agents fearing no doubt that somehow I too might be out to encourage Ukrainian nationalism.)

With the 1991 Soviet breakup, these anomalies came to the surface. For the most part, Russian-speakers in the now independent former Soviet republics accepted domination, sometimes unfair, by the non-Russian speakers. But there were exceptions. One close to Crimea but seemingly ignored (or maybe even forgotten) by those protesting Crimean events was in a breakaway region in the Transnistria region sandwiched between Moldavia with its Romanian-based culture and the western border of Ukraine.

There the pro-Russian population had decided they wanted independence, and after a brief war managed in 1992 to establish what they call the Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic, complete with its own independent government, economy, army and even national anthem.

Moscow gives some support to the fledgling state, and tries to help it gain international recognition. But it has survived mainly on its own. No one can claim it is a product of Moscow expansionism. Nor that its existence is a breach of international law.

It is, after all, a product of an important Western principle, namely the right to self-determination — particularly when people are willing to fight and suffer for it. Yet, in all the belligerent Western words over Crimea, I have not seen any serious mention of this important precedent.

What we do see mentioned, constantly, is the precedent of Russia and Georgia going to war in 2008 over South Ossetia. There the former Soviet Union had for convenience split up a pro-Russian minority people, with those to the south of the Caucasus ranges dumped into the Georgian republic as an autonomous region.

When Georgia made its foolish effort to end that autonomy by force, and Moscow retaliated with force, Western criticism of Russian “aggression and expansionism” went into overdrive, with no regard for the historical background (Ossetia’s rare culture has no relation to Georgia), who had started the fighting and what would have happened to the pro-Russian population there if Georgia had succeeded.

Do we in the West really need these kinds of knee-jerk, anti-Moscow reactions?

Breaking its post-Berlin Wall collapse promises not to try to challenge Moscow’s influence in East Europe, the West now seeks to embrace even former Soviet republics. With the breakup of Yugoslavia the Western powers have already shown their willingness to encourage dubious moves and people in order add even more to the territories under their control.

While the recent protests to overthrow an incompetent pro-Russian Ukrainian regime involved honest citizens upset by government corruption and mismanagement, they have included anti-Semitic, pro-fascist elements similar to those that assisted Hitler in an attack on Russia that had left close to 20 million dead.

After seeing these people involved in the creation of the current anti-Russian regime in Kiev (for a while they even tried to ban use of the Russian language), can we really expect Russia today to roll over and play dead today over the fate over Crimea, where even by the standards that the West imposes on others it has a strong case?
ウクライナを巡る矛盾

ウクライナのクリミヤ地区にロシヤが入った行動を欧米が批判しているのは、ダブルスタンダードの匂いがぷんぷんする。そもそもモスクワは、状況が現在とは大きく異なっていた去る1954年に、寛大ともいえることに親ロシア系領土をウクライナへ手渡したが、今回それを再度管理する目的に限定して行動を起したもの。

その動きが国際法違反、ウクライナ主権の侵犯であると批判されている。それなら54年のソビエト連邦が任意的にとった行動は国際法や主権尊重に合致した上でのものだったのか。そして西側諸国は、他国に属する領土を占領するためにはるかに乱暴なやり方で、またはるかにより正当化できない理由で、度々行動を起してきたではないか。

ウクライナを巡っては、それよりもさらに大きな矛盾さえある。そもそも今日ウクライナと呼ばれる所は、ソビエト連邦が生まれなかったならば存在しなかった。ロシア皇帝はウクライナがロシアの一部であると布告を出し、そこはロシアの言語と文化の発祥の地と位置付けていた。ソビエト政権になってその初期に、少数民族は自分たちの共和国を作り自治を許されるべきだという決定がなされたのである。

したがってウクライナで抗議デモ隊がレーニン像を打ち倒しているのは、皮肉というしかない。レーニンはウクライナに自由を与えた人物である── たとえその自由がソビエト管轄下の行政的な自由に過ぎなかったにしても。

この行政単位に任意的に含まれたものの中には、主に東に集中した純粋にロシア人人口の大きな固まりがあった。それは非常に純粋だったため、1960年代に私がモスクワから黒海までウクライナを通過してドライブした時、自分がロシアを離れたという感覚さえ持たずに通ったものだ。西に入って初めて、そこはポーランド人の影響の強いところで、独自の文化・言語を持つ土地だというしるしをあちこちに見たが、それさえ、もとはといえば、これもロシア起源の文化・言語であった。

首都キエフでは、ロシア語が主流だったが、その後のソビエトの残酷さと抑圧が一部の人々に反ロシア的なウクライナ民族主義を植え付ける結果になった。(私も小さいながら同じ犠牲者で、いつもKGB工作員に付回されることになったが、彼らはなぜか、私もまたウクライナ民族主義を扇動するためにやってきた人物と見ていたことは疑いない)

91年のソビエト解体でこれらの異常さが表面化した。ほとんどの場合前ロシア共和国でいま独立している地域のロシア語を話す人々は、ロシア語を話さない人々による、時には不公正な支配を受け入れてきた。しかし例外もあった。クリミアに近いにもかかわらずクリミア事件に抗議している人々から無視された(あるいはもともと忘れられた)ひとつの地域が、ルーマニア発祥の文化を持つモルダヴィアと、ウクライナ西部国境の間に挟まれたトランスニストリアの中の一つの分離地区の中にあった。

その地で、親ロシア派住民が独立を目指すことに決め、92年小規模の戦闘の後、プリドネストロヴィアン・モルダビア共和国と名付けたものを設立、独立した政府、経済、軍隊、また国歌までつくった。

モスクワはこの生まれたての国をある程度支援し、それが国際的承認を得る後押しをしようとした。だがその国は、ほぼ自力で生き延びた。これがモスクワの拡張主義の産物とは誰もいえない。またそれが国際法に違反しているとは、誰もいえない。

そもそも、それは欧米の重要な原理原則である民族自決の産物。── とくに住民が自らの意志で戦い苦難を受け入れる決意のもとに生まれた国であるのだから。とはいえ、クリミアを巡る欧米のすべてがけんか腰の物言いを見ると、この重要な前史についてまじめに触れたものは一つも見当たらない。

繰り返し言われることは、ロシアとグルジアが、南オセチアをめぐり2008年に戦闘に入ったという前史ばかり。そのとき、前ソビエト連邦は便宜的に親ロシア派少数民族を分離し、コーカサス山脈の南の連中と同時に、グルジア共和国の中に自治区として、彼らを投げ込んだ。

グルジアが、その自治を武力でやめさせようと愚かな努力を払い、モスクワがこれに反撃したとき、西側諸国はロシアが“抑圧と拡大主義”だと批判を過熱させた。だがその際歴史的な背景を無視し(オセチアの稀少文化はグルジアとは何の関連もないもの)、戦争を始めたのは誰なのか、またグルジアが成功していたら、その地の親ロシア派住民は一体どうなっていたかについて、完全無視だった。

われわれ欧米は、ほんとうにこのような反射的な反モスクワ・リアクションを示すことが必要なのか?

東欧におけるモスクワの影響力を侵害しないことにしようという、ベルリンの壁崩壊後の約束を破って、西側列国はいま、前ソビエト連邦の諸共和国までも手の内に入れようと画策している。ユーゴスラビアが解体して、欧米列国は管轄下に納めた領土へのコントロールをさらに強めようとして、すでに怪しげな動きと怪しい連中を後押しすることに意欲を燃やしている。

能力不足の親ロシア的ウクライナ政権を倒そうとする最近の抗議行動は、政府の腐敗と政策ミスを憤る善良な市民を巻き込んだが、その中には、2000万人死者を出したヒットラーのロシア攻撃を助けた連中とよく似た反ユダヤ、親ファシスト分子もふくまれていた。

目下のキエフの反ロシア的政権成立にこうした人間が関わっているのを見るとき、(一時期彼らはロシア語の使用さえ禁じようとした)、われわれはロシアが無抵抗になりクリミアの運命に目をつぶることを期待しているのか? これは、欧米が他人に課す基準で測ったとしても、立場が強いケースである。